Student Society – USC PRSSA Government & Student Funding http://uscprssa.com/ Government & Student Funding Wed, 16 Nov 2022 19:56:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://uscprssa.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Student Society – USC PRSSA Government & Student Funding http://uscprssa.com/ 32 32 Sri Lanka. Drop terrorism charges against student leaders detained for 90 days https://uscprssa.com/2022/11/16/sri-lanka-drop-terrorism-charges-against-student-leaders-detained-for-90-days/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 18:02:15 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2022/11/16/sri-lanka-drop-terrorism-charges-against-student-leaders-detained-for-90-days/ In response to student leaders Wasantha Mudalige and Galwewa Siridhamma Thero being detained for more than 90 days under the draconian Prevention of Terrorism Act (PTA), Thyagi Ruwanpathirana, South Asia Regional Researcher at Amnesty International, said : “The continued targeted persecution of student leaders in Sri Lanka has a chilling effect on civil society and […]]]>

In response to student leaders Wasantha Mudalige and Galwewa Siridhamma Thero being detained for more than 90 days under the draconian Prevention of Terrorism Act (PTA), Thyagi Ruwanpathirana, South Asia Regional Researcher at Amnesty International, said :

“The continued targeted persecution of student leaders in Sri Lanka has a chilling effect on civil society and the right to protest. The baseless terrorism charges against Wasantha Mudalige and Galwewa Siridhamma Thero must be immediately dropped and any extension of the detention order must be stopped.

The baseless anti-terrorism charges against Wasantha Mudalige and Galwewa Siridhamma Thero must be immediately dropped and any extension of the detention order must be stopped.

Thyagi Ruwanpathirana, South Asia Regional Researcher at Amnesty International

“The use of counter-terrorism charges against protesters is excessive and disproportionate, but they have been used time and time again by Sri Lankan authorities against critics and minorities to silence dissent. The detention of protesters on counter-terrorism charges is a gross violation of the rights to freedom of expression and peaceful assembly guaranteed by the Constitution of Sri Lanka and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, to which Sri Lanka is a State Party. International human rights law requires that anti-terrorism laws not be used to criminalize those who organize or participate in peaceful assemblies.

“The Sri Lankan authorities must repeal the PTA, which fails to meet international human rights standards, and must uphold their already stated commitment to end its use. Authorities should immediately review the detention of all those held under the PTA, ensuring adequate access to fair release hearings. They should also release any protesters facing similar charges that fail to meet international standards.

International human rights law requires that anti-terrorism laws not be used to criminalize those who organize or participate in peaceful assemblies.

Thyagi Ruwanpathirana

Background:

Sri Lankan student leaders Wasantha Mudalige, the organizer of the Inter-University Federation of Students and Galwewa Siridhamma Thero, the organizer of the Inter-University Federation Bhikku have been detained by Sri Lankan authorities since August 18, 2022. Their detention has been extended of 90 days on August 21, 2022 under the draconian Prevention of Terrorism Act (PTA) amid a continued crackdown on protesters by authorities.

Their family members and their lawyer have expressed concerns about their safety and the deterioration of their health during their detention. Amnesty International has issued an urgent action regarding the arbitrary detention of student leaders.

Amnesty International has previously documented the Sri Lankan authorities’ crackdown on protesters who are now being intimidated, harassed and arrested. The crackdown on protests and the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, movement and expression must end and the government must protect the right to protest.

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Five Students Named WVU Mountaineers of Distinction | Today https://uscprssa.com/2022/11/12/five-students-named-wvu-mountaineers-of-distinction-today/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 19:13:20 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2022/11/12/five-students-named-wvu-mountaineers-of-distinction-today/ The 2022 Mountaineers of Distinction, announced during the November 12 WVU game against Oklahoma, are (left to right) Callyn Ziegler, Giana Loretta, Trevor Swiger, Sonia-Frida Ndifon and Matthew Hudson. (WVU Photo/David Malecki) Recognized for their exemplary academic achievement and extracurricular involvement, Matthew Hudson, Giana Loretta, Sonia-Frida Ndifon, Trevor Swiger and Callyn Zeigler have been named […]]]>

The 2022 Mountaineers of Distinction, announced during the November 12 WVU game against Oklahoma, are (left to right) Callyn Ziegler, Giana Loretta, Trevor Swiger, Sonia-Frida Ndifon and Matthew Hudson.
(WVU Photo/David Malecki)

Recognized for their exemplary academic achievement and extracurricular involvement, Matthew Hudson, Giana Loretta, Sonia-Frida Ndifon, Trevor Swiger and Callyn Zeigler have been named West Virginia University Mountaineers of Distinction 2022, a mountaineer week tradition.

The recipients, representing a range of disciplines while sharing impressive academic achievements and service to their communities, were chosen by an interview selection committee from a pool of nearly 80 students who were nominated on campus.

The five seniors, all members of the WVU Honors College, were announced as this year’s honorees at halftime of the WVU vs Oklahoma football game today (November 12) at Puskar Stadium in Milan.

Hudson, from Scott Depot, is an immunology and medical microbiology major that has maintained a 4.0 grade point average. He is a Presidential Student Ambassador, Senator for the College of Health Sciences with the Student Government Association, and Student Ambassador for the Medical Immunology and Microbiology Program at the School of Medicine.

Hudson is also president of WVU Global Medical, a member of the WVU dental brigades, and volunteers his time to facilitate mobile pantries for the non-profit organization Pantry Plus More.

He was accepted into the School of Medicine’s Early Decision Program and presented his research on the antibody response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in patients with cystic fibrosis at the Undergraduate Research Day of West Virginia 2022 at the Capitol.

Lorette, from Shinnston, is a political science, philosophy, and communication major that maintained a 4.0 grade point average. She is a Presidential Student Ambassador, Intern at the College of Law West Virginia Innocence Project, and Student Ambassador for Admissions. Loretta is a 2022 Newman Civic Scholar, 2019 Neil S. Bucklew Scholar, and a two-year Eberly College Scholar.

She has provided more than 300 hours of service to organizations that address educational inequality in the state, such as Girls on the Run of North Central West Virginia and Literacy Volunteers of Monongalia and Preston Counties.

As a member of the Honors College EXCEL program, Loretta leads an independent research project to evaluate charter schools in the state.

Ndifon, originally from Cameroon who now resides in Elkridge, Maryland, is a biomedical engineering student. She is President of the African Students Association, Student Ambassador for the Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources, and Resident Assistant. She is also a member of the National Society of Black Engineers and the Black Student Union and works as a MindFit tutor.

Ndifon is a recipient of the Black Excellence Award, the Undergraduate Student Award for Excellence in Community Service, and the Office of Global Affairs Merit Award.

She serves her community through medicine with WVU Medicine, Amedisys Hospice Care and Mon Health Medical Center.

Swinger, a first-generation Grafton student, is a communication studies and interdisciplinary studies major who maintained a cumulative grade point average of 4.0. He is a Social Media and Marketing Intern for Vantage Ventures and Chairman and National Chapter Nominating Committee Chair for the WVU Mortar Board.

Swiger is a 2020-21 FFA National Nominee Finalist and Lambda Pi Eta and Chimes Junior Honorary inductee.

He volunteers his time to mentor youth in leadership and career success through the National FFA Organization, American Legion Mountaineer Boys State, and the Mountaineer Mentors Program.

Zeigler, from Charleston, is a computer engineering and computer science major. She is a Presidential Student Ambassador and Teaching Assistant and Student Ambassador for Statler College. Zeigler is a Neil S. Bucklew Fellow and a member of the Tau Beta Pi Engineering Honor Society.

She devotes her time to outreach initiatives across the state that spark interest in engineering careers among young female students as a mentor for the Society of Women Engineers,

She also volunteers for the Appalachian Prison Book Project, Empty Bowls Monongalia, and WVU Medicine Children’s Hospital.

The other Mountaineers of Distinction finalists were: Aubrey Cumberledge, a biology major from Wallace; Samuel Cyphert, a mechanical and aerospace engineering student from Morgantown; Michael DiBacco, a biology and English major from Elkins; Lydia Knutsen, an industrial engineering student from Glen Dale; and Elizabeth Sexton, an accounting and finance major from Williamstown.

In addition to the presentation of the Mountaineers of Distinction, the University’s “most faithful” were honored during the halftime ceremonies. The 2022 winners are Harvey and Jennifer Peyton, the most loyal West Virginians; Lloyd Jackson, the most faithful climber of the alumni; Jennifer Williams, Most Loyal Teacher/Pro Mountaineer; and Cathy Martin, most loyal staff mountaineer.

The most loyal award recipients are chosen by a joint committee representing the WVU Foundation, Alumni Association, Staff Council, Faculty Senate, and the Mountaineering Week Organizing Committee.

Find out more about the 75th Mountaineering Week.

-WVU-

your/11/12/22

MEDIA CONTACT: Kristie Stewart-Gale
Marketing and Advertising Manager
WVU Arts and Entertainment
304-293-8221; kristie.stewart-gale@mail.wvu.edu

Call 1-855-WVU-NEWS for the latest West Virginia University news and information from WVUToday.

Follow @WVUToday on Twitter.

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Indigenous community aggrieved by Brackeen v. Haaland SCOTUS https://uscprssa.com/2022/11/10/indigenous-community-aggrieved-by-brackeen-v-haaland-scotus/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 06:28:54 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2022/11/10/indigenous-community-aggrieved-by-brackeen-v-haaland-scotus/ To support student journalism and the content you love, become a member of Daily Orange today. Scott Stevens said anyone seeking justice from the current US Supreme Court is alive at the wrong time. Arguments began on Wednesday over the Supreme Court case Brackeen vs. Haalandwhich could strike down the Indian Child Welfare Act of […]]]>

To support student journalism and the content you love, become a member of Daily Orange today.

Scott Stevens said anyone seeking justice from the current US Supreme Court is alive at the wrong time.

Arguments began on Wednesday over the Supreme Court case Brackeen vs. Haalandwhich could strike down the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978, a law that prioritizes adoption of Indigenous children by a blood relative or citizen of an Indigenous tribe over non-Indigenous families, as unconstitutional.

Stevens, a member of the Mohawk Nation of Akwesasne and director of Native American and Indigenous Studies at Syracuse University, said the Supreme Court could seek to strike down more protections and freedoms for Indigenous communities in the United States if the law is deemed unconstitutional.

“It’s a large-scale movement against Indigenous sovereignty,” Stevens said. “Currently, Indigenous sovereignty is determined by the federal government alone, and this is based on precedent from the early 19th century. (But) the Supreme Court is not interested in precedents and how American law has worked for over 200 years.



In its final decision, the Supreme Court will determine whether the ICWA discriminates on the basis of race against non-Indigenous adoptive families. The Supreme Court will also decide whether the law violates the 10th Amendment by overriding the federal government’s role in fostering children, which is set as precedent in Sosna v. Iowa.

The lawsuit over the legality of ICWA was brought by the states of Texas, Indiana and Louisiana, as well as several individuals.

Secorrah Benedict, a graduate of Big Picture Home High School in Lafayette and a member of the Three Affiliated Tribes of North Dakota, called the potential overthrow of ICWA “disgusting.” Benedict said it was unfair for Indigenous children to be taken from their families and forced to settle with white families.

Katlyn Arnold, a junior at Big Picture Home and a member of the Onondaga and Oneida Nations in Wisconsin, called the potential reversal devastating but said it was nothing new for the Indigenous community.

“We’re just repeating history over and over again,” Arnold said. “There is never a stop, and it continues.”

The ICWA was drafted in Congress and signed into law by then-President Jimmy Carter after longstanding efforts to attack Indigenous identity and sovereignty, Stevens said.

Before adopting the ICWA, Stevens said, individual states were allowed to take children from poor native communities if they were “deemed unsafe” and allow non-native families to adopt them.

A 1976 study by the Association on American Indian Affairs found that between 25% and 35% of all Native children were placed in out-of-home care, with 90% of those children transferred to non-Native homes and institutions. .

“It was just another way of stealing kids and giving them to white people,” Stevens said.

Robert Searing, curator of history at the Onondaga Historical Association, said Brackeen vs. Haaland is the culmination of a complex relationship between the Indigenous community and the US government.

Decisions in cases dating from the early 19th century, such as Worcester v. Georgia and Tenant of Johnson & Graham v. McIntosh Established legal precedent that any negotiation, treaty, or agreement can only be entered into between the federal government and Indigenous tribes, without the interference of individual states or other actors.

Searing said these three cases, referred to by both Searing and Stevens as the “Marshall Trilogy,” became seminal in the creation of American constitutional jurisprudence, providing the legal framework for the relationship between the United States and Indigenous tribes. .

But Searing said he found it interesting that the Supreme Court would take this case first, given what would happen if the court overturned centuries of precedence.

“Every time the Supreme Court overturns a long-standing precedent, it raises eyebrows and raises questions,” Searing said. “When you move away from precedent, it tends to broaden the scope of rights. Instead, we see the opposite with this Supreme Court.

Searing and Stevens said the decision to Brackeen vs. Haaland could have effects similar to those of the decision to annul Roe vs. Wade. If the Supreme Court declares the ICWA unconstitutional, it would be a “direct attack” on the constitutional right to privacy, Searing said.

In a recent discussion hosted by the SU Aboriginal Student Program and Office of Multicultural Affairs on Aboriginal issues, SU Senior Brandon Silvas, Onondaga Nation member, and other Aboriginal students shared similar points of view.

“If removed, it could set a precedent for many other things that have been put in place to protect Native Americans,” Silvas said at the meeting. “It’s sad to think that these children could be torn from their families and their culture.”

Stevens said the issue of Indigenous families fighting to keep their children from non-Indigenous families is a practice that dates back to the late 19th century, when the United States sought forced assimilation of Indigenous tribes into American society. through boarding schools.

In effect, the project continued 20th century efforts to remove Indigenous children from Indigenous households. About one in three Indigenous children was separated from their families between 1941 and 1967, according to a 1976 report by the Association on American Indian Affairs.

Searing said politics was a dark chapter in the history of Native tribes in the United States

“The inhumanity of this is almost unheard of here in the United States, unfortunately,” Searing said.

Neal Powless, an SU academic mediator and member of the Onondaga Nation, said a lack of education about Indigenous history and culture is at the heart of the tension between the United States and Indigenous tribes.

“How can a person who knows nothing about indigenous people raise an indigenous child knowing where he comes from? Powless said. “How is this individual really going to do this child justice if he himself doesn’t have access to or understand these basic things?”

There is no official timeline on when the Supreme Court will issue a final decision on the case as of Wednesday.

Stevens said there was more than the concerns of Indigenous families at stake in Brackeen vs. Haaland.

“(The plaintiffs) don’t have a dog in this fight,” Stevens said. “I don’t think they care about the child in this case or the family, but they see that if this were overturned it would undermine the whole structure of federal Indian law.”

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“It’s a springboard to life” – Capital Gazette https://uscprssa.com/2022/11/05/its-a-springboard-to-life-capital-gazette/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 09:00:55 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2022/11/05/its-a-springboard-to-life-capital-gazette/ At Broadneck High School, a mural is being painted in a school bathroom featuring a silhouette, flowers and a statement, “You spend most of your time in your mind, make sure it’s a beautiful place where to be.” The painting began last year as part of a community project for the Student Alliance for School […]]]>

At Broadneck High School, a mural is being painted in a school bathroom featuring a silhouette, flowers and a statement, “You spend most of your time in your mind, make sure it’s a beautiful place where to be.”

The painting began last year as part of a community project for the Student Alliance for School Flourishment, a new initiative at Anne Arundel County Public Schools funded by the Schools Relief Fund. emergency for elementary and secondary schools. Now in five high schools and three Anne Arundel middle schools, the alliance uses a scale with six determinants of well-being or fulfillment: happiness and life satisfaction, mental and physical health, meaning and purpose, character and virtue, close social relations and financial and material stability.

The program operates at Broadneck, Crofton, Southern, Northeast and Annapolis High Schools and Magothy River, Northeast and Southern Middle Schools. Last year there were about 42 participants.

Through activities such as journaling, meditation, mindfulness exercises and community projects, alliance students and teachers can tap into their personal “fulfillment,” said Tara Segree, Broadneck teacher and godmother. of the alliance last year. Students and teachers are encouraged to check their own level of fulfillment and, where they can, to work with others, the community and eventually the world to enhance the flourishing of society.

Once students know how to rebuild themselves after a tough day, perhaps through art or music, they can share that confidence to meet life’s challenges with others, Segree said. “Whether academically, socially or philanthropically, it is just a foundation. It is a springboard to living life, flourishing, instead of languishing.

Director of Student Services and Support Ryan Voegtlin said the school system launched the program in 2020 and expanded it this school year, adding four more schools, and is discussing further expansion. Two contracts have been awarded related to the program under the FY2023 budget; $41,000 for Notre Dame University in Maryland and $49,000 for Saint Louis University.

At Broadneck, the initiative has grown from four student members in the 2020-21 school year to eight in 2021-22.

Segree said an important aspect is getting students to understand that they are not struggling alone.

“We’re always going to have struggles and challenges, but it’s how you respond to your challenges that gives you the life you live,” she said.

Segree was the alliance advisor at Broadneck for the past two years, but is stepping back this year to serve as the class of 2023 advisor. Coach and teacher DJ Hunt has taken over and plans to recruit members of the alliance this month. This year he said he plans to have an all-male group, to provide a safe space for the boys to come in and “not be okay if they’re not well”.

“A lot of times society tells us as men that we have to be strong and we have to keep it all inside and we have to not be able to show emotions and express our concern,” said Hunter. “I want my room and my band to do the opposite.”

Voegtlin said students already had mental health issues before the COVID-19 pandemic, leading the system to create a mental health task force. A report released by the task force in October 2020 found that factors such as family substance use, stress and pressure, social media, poverty, trauma, lack of access to mental health resources , discrimination, stigma, and cultural barriers were all affecting student mental health before the pandemic. And the pandemic has only made things worse.

“It created more loss, more trauma,” Voegtlin said. “Those children who were struggling before continue to struggle even more.”

The system completed 506 student suicide risk assessments between Aug. 29 and Oct. 14, Voegtlin said. In 2021, during the same period, the system carried out 368 assessments; in 2019 he completed 460 and in 2018 he completed 467.

“We were in crisis mode last year,” Voegtlin said. “This year, we are less in crisis mode, more in recovery mode.”

The new Student Alliance for Flourishing is one of many supports for students recovering mentally from the disruptions caused by COVID, along with more counselors in schools and expanded school-based mental health care, in which professionals come at school to meet and treat students so they don’t need to travel for appointments.

Notre Dame University in Maryland works with teachers, counselors and students to develop and manage the program, last year in conjunction with Saint Louis University. In addition to the Student Alliance for Fulfillment, Notre Dame runs the Teachers’ Alliance for Fulfillment. Assistant special education teacher Kristine Larson said she wants “fulfillment” and associated standards to be embedded in the common vernacular, so that the needs of students and teachers can be holistically addressed.

Molly Dunn, an assistant professor at Notre Dame’s School of Education, said one of the aims of the program was to engage teachers with the concept of flourishing from the start, to ensure they can identify what they need to thrive and avoid burnout.

“To give them the tools to feel empowered to thrive in a stressful profession, made even more stressful by a pandemic,” Dunn said.

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Technical factors linked to higher NAEP scores https://uscprssa.com/2022/11/02/technical-factors-linked-to-higher-naep-scores/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 22:36:30 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2022/11/02/technical-factors-linked-to-higher-naep-scores/ Access to technology and good learning environments make a difference when it comes to student success. That’s a key lesson from the latest National School Progress Assessment scores, which showed widespread declines in reading and math results due to the pandemic. A teacher, a quiet place to study, internet access at home and at school, […]]]>

Access to technology and good learning environments make a difference when it comes to student success.

That’s a key lesson from the latest National School Progress Assessment scores, which showed widespread declines in reading and math results due to the pandemic.

A teacher, a quiet place to study, internet access at home and at school, all of these things, when done right, will have a huge impact.

Joseph South, Director of Learning, International Society for Technology in Education

Achievement scores showed that top performers were more likely to have access to laptops or other computing devices, an internet connection, a quiet place to work at home, school supplies and real-time daily lessons than lower-performing students, according to teacher survey data released last month alongside student results on the NAEP, also known as the National Report Card.

More than half of 4th graders — 58%, according to the math survey — have been learning remotely for at least part of the 2020-2021 school year. But learning conditions outside of school were very different for students who performed in the top quartile (high performers) than for many of those who performed in the bottom quartile (lowest performers). performing).

The most striking finding: High-performing students were more likely — in some cases, significantly more likely — to participate in real-time virtual lessons with a teacher every day or almost every day. For example, nearly three-quarters (71%) of high-achieving 8th grade math students took these courses, compared to less than half (41%) of low-achieving students.

The differential for Grade 8 reading was even more dramatic, with 74% of top performers participating in daily or nearly daily virtual lessons, compared to just 39% of bottom performers.

The percentages were closer for younger students, but still showed significant differences. Fifty percent of high-achieving Grade 4 reading students had daily access to real-time virtual lessons, compared to 37% of low-achieving students.

Access to technology and appropriate learning environments are important

Access to technology also had a significant effect on success. For example, for Grade 4 math, 80% of high-achieving students had access to a desktop or laptop computer, or tablet, all the time. But only 50% of low performers could say the same.

Appropriate learning environments also had a big influence on success:

  • 90% of high-performing 4th grade math students had a quiet place to work available at least some of the time, compared to 70% of low-performing students.
  • 89% of top performers had consistent access to school supplies, compared to 61% of bottom performers.
  • And 87% of high performers had access to an internet connection at least some of the time, compared to 71% of low performers.

Survey results for Grade 4 Reading and Grade 8 Math and Reading revealed similar gaps.

Overall, students’ NAEP scores have plummeted, revealing the devastating impact of the pandemic’s disrupted learning. Results for students who took the test in the spring of 2022 — the NAEP’s first major administration for these years since the start of the pandemic — show the largest drop in math performance in grades 4 and 8 since the test program began in 1990.

Clearly, reliable technology tools — and real-time lessons — were essential for effective virtual learning, said Joseph South, director of learning for the International Society for Technology in Education.

It reminded him of an analogy: a patient trying to get substantial meals in liquid form. “If you had some access [to those tools] then you would suck your nutrition through a little straw,” he said. “If you had a lot of access, it was like drinking from a giant glass. If you didn’t have access, then you got no nutrition.

This analogy will continue to hold true, South pointed out, as schools transition to a more digital model of teaching delivery. “A teacher, a quiet place to study, internet access at home and at school, all of these things, when done right, will have a huge impact,” he said.

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NTCC Webb Society presents at Nacogdoches – The Gilmer Mirror https://uscprssa.com/2022/10/30/ntcc-webb-society-presents-at-nacogdoches-the-gilmer-mirror/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 20:04:34 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2022/10/30/ntcc-webb-society-presents-at-nacogdoches-the-gilmer-mirror/ Pictured (left to right): Michelle Calderon, Neida Perez, Sam Pollan, Aubrey Watkins, Keren Valencia and Victoria Matiz. By: Dr. Andrew Yox, Director of Honors The NTCC Webb Society, made up mostly of Honors Northeast students, presented its eighth trailer for an upcoming film at a State Walter Prescott Webb Society fall meeting Oct. 14 in […]]]>

Pictured (left to right): Michelle Calderon, Neida Perez, Sam Pollan, Aubrey Watkins, Keren Valencia and Victoria Matiz.

By: Dr. Andrew Yox, Director of Honors

The NTCC Webb Society, made up mostly of Honors Northeast students, presented its eighth trailer for an upcoming film at a State Walter Prescott Webb Society fall meeting Oct. 14 in Nacogdoches. The trailer and upcoming movie are titled “Texas Suffragette: The Minnie Fisher Cunningham Story.” The film was written and directed by Texas Heritage National Bank Fellow Skylar Fondren. The group is working to release this spring the first feature film on the surprising victory of the Texas suffragettes. In June 1919, through their efforts, Texas became the ninth state in the union to adopt the Nineteenth Amendment. It was also the first southern state to leave an anti-suffragette coalition led by the former Confederate States.

The Walter Prescott Webb Society, founded in 1973 by University of Texas professor Joe Frantz, is the collegiate auxiliary of the Texas State Historical Association.

Six first-year Honors Northeast scholars discussed the making of the Cunningham film and the development of its story. Michelle Calderon marked the film initiative’s debut with an early June 2022 trip to the University of Houston. Film scholar Keren Valencia discussed the indirect politics that made Texas women successful. Aubrey Watkins discussed student response to sudden imperatives to act. Victoria Matiz covered the role of the students handling camcorders and boom mics for the first time, and Neida Perez covered the film’s tight week-long itinerary that began at the Whatley Center and ended in Fredericksburg. Finally, Sam Pollan, the film’s producer, showed the trailer for the film that he had edited. The trailer highlights the challenges Cunningham faces.

The trailer for this year’s film once again owes a lot to Texas-based composer Kenny Goodson. He created the music for the film after viewing footage compiled by Pollan. Goodson also plays a role in the film as a minister who presides over Cunningham and her husband’s wedding. The trailer features honorary student Skylar Hodson, who played the lead role of Minnie Fisher Cunningham. but also features Sam Pollan, who played her ex-husband, BJ, Dr. Maryna Otero, now an NTCC assistant and also an ESL principal at Mount Pleasant High School, has a starring role in the trailer in as Annette Finnegan, who galvanizes Minnie Fisher Cunningham to lead the Texas movement.

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Zurek named a Fellow of the American Physical Society – UBNow: News and Views for UB Faculty and Staff https://uscprssa.com/2022/10/28/zurek-named-a-fellow-of-the-american-physical-society-ubnow-news-and-views-for-ub-faculty-and-staff/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 12:16:47 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2022/10/28/zurek-named-a-fellow-of-the-american-physical-society-ubnow-news-and-views-for-ub-faculty-and-staff/ UB theoretical and computational chemist Eva Zurek has been named a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS). Zurek is a professor of chemistry in the College of Arts and Sciences and an adjunct faculty member in physics and chemical and biological engineering. His research uses supercomputers and first-principles calculations to study the electronic structure, […]]]>

UB theoretical and computational chemist Eva Zurek has been named a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS).

Zurek is a professor of chemistry in the College of Arts and Sciences and an adjunct faculty member in physics and chemical and biological engineering. His research uses supercomputers and first-principles calculations to study the electronic structure, properties, and reactivity of a wide variety of materials.

APS is a nonprofit organization that works to advance and disseminate knowledge in physics through research journals, scientific meetings, and educational, outreach, advocacy, and international activities.

According to the scholarship citation, Zurek is recognized “for applying state-of-the-art computational electronic structure methods to revealing microscopic processes occurring in large molecules and nanostructures, for designing hydride superconductors, and for related educational innovations in Computer Science”.

She was recommended for this honor by the APS Division of Computational Physics. She was elected vice president of the division in 2022, a four-year position that will later include terms as president-elect, president, and president-past.

The APS scholarship signifies recognition by professional peers. Each year, no more than half of 1% of the membership of the society (excluding student members) is recognized by election for APS membership.

Zurek’s work has had a broad impact on materials science and discovery. She is interested in high-pressure science; superhard, superconducting, quantum and planetary materials; catalysis; and solvated electrons and electrodes. His team has developed an open-source computer program called XtalOpt that allows scientists to predict the crystal structures of materials and has used the program to identify new superconducting candidates.

Author of over 160 publications, Zurek has received funding from the US National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, US National Nuclear Security Administration and US Office of Naval Research.

She has sat on the thesis committee of more than 30 doctoral students. Eight mentees have earned doctorates from his lab, and all have obtained employment or scholarships in their field.

Additionally, Zurek has dedicated time and energy to communicating science to the public. She was interviewed by Scientific American; Science Friday, broadcast by public radio stations across the United States; CBC’s Quirks and Quarks; The New York Times; and many other outlets on advances in materials discovery.

Zurek has received numerous accolades, including the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Scholarship and Creative Endeavors and the Sloan Fellowship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. She obtained her doctorate at the University of Stuttgart in Germany.

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Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers builds community at UGA | Arts & Culture https://uscprssa.com/2022/10/25/society-of-hispanic-professional-engineers-builds-community-at-uga-arts-culture/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2022/10/25/society-of-hispanic-professional-engineers-builds-community-at-uga-arts-culture/ A relatively new student organization is thriving – the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers strives to support and uplift the Hispanic engineering community at the University of Georgia. The SHPE also provides members with networking opportunities to achieve their engineering career goals and creates a community for students to develop connections with other Hispanic students […]]]>

A relatively new student organization is thriving – the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers strives to support and uplift the Hispanic engineering community at the University of Georgia. The SHPE also provides members with networking opportunities to achieve their engineering career goals and creates a community for students to develop connections with other Hispanic students at UGA.

The SHPE became an official student organization of UGA in 2015 and became a nationally recognized chapter in 2019. The national mission of the association is to “empower the Hispanic community to realize their full potential and to impact the world through STEM awareness, access and support. and development.

The UGA chapter of the SHPE fulfills this mission by taking its members to national conventions, organizing social activities and organizing general meetings. This year, the group partnered with UGA’s National Society of Black Engineers on an evening of roller skating and rock climbing with Kennesaw State University’s SHPE chapter.

SHPE held its first-ever Hispanic Heritage Month kick-off dinner on September 15, hosted by restaurants in Athens. Professors, other SHPE chapters in Georgia, and members of UGA student organizations such as the Arch Society were invited to attend.

“It’s a way to see that we’re making progress, not just word of mouth, but just seeing people engage and get more involved,” said club president Alberto Bustamante, a graduate in biological engineering. “It means a lot.”

The next national congress of the SHPE will take place at the beginning of November. Bustamante recommends all members go, saying that attending national conventions “changes your view of the SHPE”.

Bustamante recalled that the first time he went to a national convention was when he first decided he wanted to join the SHPE. This year, the organization is bringing more members to the national convention than ever before. The convention will be held in Charlotte, North Carolina, November 2-6.

The organization uses donations from sponsors to help fund these social activities and trips to national conventions. Micron Technology, a computer memory and data storage manufacturing company, recently donated $2,000 to SHPE at UGA.

“At the end of the day, they are gifts from people’s hearts,” Bustamante said. “They want to help us succeed.”

SHPE members are also introduced to representatives of large companies like Verizon. Will Davis, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Program Manager and Equal Employment Opportunity Specialist at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, came to speak to students at the club.

“It just helps you grow your relationships and your network,” said SHPE Academic Excellence Chair and sophomore civil engineering student Veronica Perez. “I think that’s my favorite part, just getting to know more people within college.”

Since her hire in January 2022, the UGA College of Engineering’s first associate dean for undergraduate diversity, equity, and inclusion, Sonia Garcia, has been particularly involved with the SHPE.

“It is a huge honor to work together with SHPE, as well as the various DEI-related organizations at the College of Engineering,” said Garcia. “We want SHPE and all College of Engineering students to feel supported, but more importantly, to feel like they belong in this community.”

With SHPE reaching its largest membership yet and having its biggest year of recognition, the club continues to grow and impact the lives of people within the College of Engineering Hispanic community.

“My favorite part is knowing that not just myself, but this chapter in general can help you grow not just as a person but as a professional,” Bustamante said.

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Shoreline Cleanup | News, Sports, Jobs https://uscprssa.com/2022/10/22/shoreline-cleanup-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 05:39:23 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2022/10/22/shoreline-cleanup-news-sports-jobs/ As part of “Rake for the Lake”, this is one of the piles of leaves and debris collected from the shores of Lake Chautuqua. PJ Photo by Michael Zabrodsky Heather Caskey of the Chautauqua Lake Association told Southwestern Central School student volunteers Jayden Hultin, Nolan Froah and Nick Swan this Friday as they listened to […]]]>

As part of “Rake for the Lake”, this is one of the piles of leaves and debris collected from the shores of Lake Chautuqua. PJ Photo by Michael Zabrodsky

Heather Caskey of the Chautauqua Lake Association told Southwestern Central School student volunteers Jayden Hultin, Nolan Froah and Nick Swan this Friday as they listened to further instructions for weeding the shoreline of Chautauqua Lake at the YWCA, 185 E. Terrace Avenue.

A few minutes later, some members of the SWCS National Honor Society arrived, were given the same instructions, and then with rakes and wheelbarrows in hand, the students followed CLA President Rudy Mueller to shore to begin “Rake for the lake.”

Mueller is looking for volunteers who live along the shore. He said it didn’t come from the earth, nor from the water. It’s just along the shore.

He said his goal was to get rid of the weeds that have been floating around over the past month. The CLA has no more material in the water, otherwise the association would try to pull out the weeds. What he doesn’t want to see are the weeds overwintering and decomposing. If weeds sit still, they turn into muck, muck and fertilizer for algae blooms and next year’s weed growth, he said.

Left to right, Southwestern Central School students Alexis Grijalva, Faith Hamilton, Samuel Mincarelli and Heidi Swan-Leuze help Rudy Mueller, president of the Chautauqua Lake Association, rear, weed the lake Chautauqua.

Heidi Swan-Leuze, Samuel Mincarelli, Faith Hamilton and Alexis Grijalva formed a group and started removing some weeds. As soon as the group formed a pile, Brandon Smith arrived with a wheelbarrow, and the pile was transferred to the wheelbarrow. Smith then grabbed the wheelbarrow and drove it to the sidewalk at the opening of Y’s driveway. There he emptied the pile into a larger pile of weeds.

“We are happy to do something for our community. They (students) will earn a few hours of community service, which are requirements for National Honor Scoiety membership. They also enjoy helping the community,” said Katie Damcott, adviser to the SWCS Honor Society, which oversaw society members Swan-Leuze, Grijalva, Mincarelli and Hamilton.

Mueller said because the water level will drop, the weeds will be fresh. He noted that this project is not affiliated with the Village of Lakewood Leaf Pickup. If you volunteer, the weeds will have to be taken to the side of the road. The village public works department will collect weeds during the week of Oct. 24, Mueller said.

Currently, this is a Lakewood-only project, but Mueller hopes other lakeside municipalities will host similar events.

Mueller said people who live along the shoreline in the village can start volunteering at any time, but all work must be completed and curbside by Sunday.

Chautauqua Lake Association President Rudy Mueller explains to Southwestern Central School students Nick Swan, Jayden Hultin and Nolan Froah about shoreline cleanup. CLA employee Heather Caskey is also listening. PJ Pictures by Michael Zabrodsky


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‘Black Adam’, ‘Ticket to Paradise’, more https://uscprssa.com/2022/10/19/black-adam-ticket-to-paradise-more/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 11:35:22 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2022/10/19/black-adam-ticket-to-paradise-more/ Note: This is valid for the week beginning October 21. The fall has been relatively quiet, from a blockbuster standpoint. But it looks like the stars will be out in force this weekend. Here’s what’s new in theaters in the Milwaukee area starting Friday, plus some of the new movies available for streaming and on-demand […]]]>

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