Student Society – USC PRSSA Government & Student Funding http://uscprssa.com/ Government & Student Funding Tue, 21 Sep 2021 20:27:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://uscprssa.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Student Society – USC PRSSA Government & Student Funding http://uscprssa.com/ 32 32 T-Mobile’s educational initiatives have connected 3 million students … and we’re just getting started https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/21/t-mobiles-educational-initiatives-have-connected-3-million-students-and-were-just-getting-started/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/21/t-mobiles-educational-initiatives-have-connected-3-million-students-and-were-just-getting-started/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 20:11:01 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/21/t-mobiles-educational-initiatives-have-connected-3-million-students-and-were-just-getting-started/ Posted 27 minutes ago Proposed by T Mobile By Mike Sievert, CEO of T-Mobile The last school year has been anything but normal for America’s 56 million K-12 students. You hear the word “unprecedented” a lot, and it really was. Many young students are used to the structure and routine, and rely on tools in […]]]>

Posted 27 minutes ago

Proposed by T Mobile

By Mike Sievert, CEO of T-Mobile

The last school year has been anything but normal for America’s 56 million K-12 students. You hear the word “unprecedented” a lot, and it really was. Many young students are used to the structure and routine, and rely on tools in school that they may not be able to get at home, such as reliable internet connectivity. For these children, school closures across the country have had impacts that experts are still trying to fully understand.

This problem is not new – the pandemic has just brought it to light. And although most students across the country have returned to in-person learning, the problem persists. While estimates of the number of students who lack reliable connectivity outside of the classroom vary widely, what we do know for sure is that this problem has affected millions of people – for many years. Education is supposed to be the great leveler in our society, but for there to be more equal outcomes there has to be more equal access – and in this case, that means equal access to broadband connectivity even after students leave school for the day.

This is why, even before the pandemic, T-Mobile saw the potential to take on the enormous network capacity that our newly merged company would provide and designed a program that addresses this important digital divide issue, called “the gap.” homework ”, at a size and scale that is truly historic. It is a program which, to our knowledge, is one of the largest and most ambitious programs ever launched by a non-governmental organization to connect children. Our $ 10.7 billion project, officially launched in 2020, now offers free internet service and free mobile hotspots to under-connected households with school-aged children, with the goal of reaching up to 10 million eligible households over five years. The program provides free, highly subsidized data plans for school districts that they can provide to their students for free.

The timing couldn’t have been more critical. When COVID-19 hit, students without reliable digital access were not only left behind, they were cut off from the classroom altogether. For our part, the T-Mobile teams who had previously worked with school districts across the country have shifted into high gear. And the result has been that over 1,000 school districts have signed up for the program and that thousands of individual families with eligible students have signed up directly. All inclusive, T-Mobile has logged in 3 million students nationwide since the start of last year.

A story from the Renton School District, a participant in the 10 Million Project just down the road from T-Mobile’s headquarters in Bellevue, Wash., Underscores the need for this program. After school counselor Sophia Simpson-Verger moved in-person parent conferences to Zoom, she became concerned when several families did not show up for their digital sessions. So she decided to hide and stop by to find out why. Sophia learned that many of her students did not have reliable connectivity. Parents couldn’t log into the lectures, and students even used a parent’s cell phone to try to keep up with distance learning every day.

Imagine going to school with a cell phone. It’s heartbreaking but it’s not uncommon either. And it persists even after things have started to return to in-person learning as we look forward to post-pandemic times. The digital divide has not disappeared with the deployment of vaccines. As schools reopened last spring and children of all ages began returning to class, about two-thirds of U.S. public schools were still taking at least some of their homework. And it’s a slippery slope. Children who don’t have the tools they need are left behind. And the more students fall behind, the more difficult it is for them to stay motivated.

Integrating technology into the classroom has clear benefits as the digital economy grows exponentially, but until now, universal access to the tools needed to participate equitably has remained elusive. An important factor is the expense, especially for economically disadvantaged families. Families in the United States pay an average of $ 68 per month just for home Internet service, according to data from New America. Add in taxes and things like equipment rental fees and the total often goes up from $ 80 to $ 100, depending on where they live. This may not seem like much to some people, but for families who live on paychecks with a myriad of other bills to pay, finding an extra $ 100 a month just isn’t possible.

While the solution sounds simple – make sure every student in America has broadband service and a device to connect to it – the reality is not. But we are making huge progress. I am proud to say that T-Mobile has been one of the strongest advocates of universal connectivity. We began our campaign to bridge the gap long before pandemic-induced distance learning turned a lingering problem into a crisis in its own right – and we’re not stopping now. Programs like Project 10Million are crucial for young people across the country. As our global society becomes increasingly dependent on internet technology, we cannot take it for granted that everyone, all over the world, can go online when they need to. Last month, I shared another blog post about T-Mobile’s commitment to bridging the digital divide for ALL. No American, no matter what their economic situation and whether they live in an urban or rural area, should be left behind.

In my opinion, T-Mobile has an important role to play in permanently eliminating the digital divide in this country. So every American student has access to the connectivity they need. As much as we have done so far to connect millions of students across the country, there are millions more to be done. Now we are eagerly awaiting the second full school year of the 10Million Project – and we are just getting started.

To learn more about T-Mobile’s 10Million Project or to enroll your school district in the program, visit www.t-mobile.com/p10m. If you are the parent or guardian of an eligible student, you can register at www.t-mobile.com/project10million.

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T Mobile

T Mobile

As a US non-operator, T-Mobile US, Inc. (NASDAQ: TMUS) is redefining the way consumers and businesses purchase wireless services through cutting-edge product and service innovation. The company’s advanced national 4G LTE network delivers exceptional wireless experiences to millions of customers who don’t want to compromise on quality and value.

Based in Bellevue, Washington, T-Mobile US provides services through its subsidiaries and operates its flagship brands, T-Mobile and Metro by T-Mobile.

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UBC’s vaccine disclosure and rapid testing policies leave out one group on campus: visitors https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/20/ubcs-vaccine-disclosure-and-rapid-testing-policies-leave-out-one-group-on-campus-visitors/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/20/ubcs-vaccine-disclosure-and-rapid-testing-policies-leave-out-one-group-on-campus-visitors/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 20:13:29 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/20/ubcs-vaccine-disclosure-and-rapid-testing-policies-leave-out-one-group-on-campus-visitors/ Guidelines for visitors to campus remain unclear as UBC begins its third week of in-person classes. UBC has announced a slew of new COVID-19-related restrictions in recent weeks – from mandatory rapid testing for those not vaccinated to the requirement for home vaccination. On August 24, the provincial health officer obligatory non-medical masks in all […]]]>

Guidelines for visitors to campus remain unclear as UBC begins its third week of in-person classes.

UBC has announced a slew of new COVID-19-related restrictions in recent weeks – from mandatory rapid testing for those not vaccinated to the requirement for home vaccination. On August 24, the provincial health officer obligatory non-medical masks in all indoor public spaces, including classrooms and laboratories – and introduced the BC Vaccine Card the day before.

However, visitors to the UBC campus will not be required to disclose their immunization status, or undergo rapid testing, under current UBC policies.

Matthew Ramsey, director of university affairs at UBC Vancouver Media Relations, confirmed that visitors will not be covered by current UBC plans.

“Keeping track of visitors has proven to be so complex and difficult that it was almost impossible to achieve in the current system,” said Ramsey. “And in reality, the BC Vaccine Card provides a level of assurance to the UBC community that people who come to campus to participate in discretionary activities will be required to provide proof of vaccination to do so.”

The Department of Health provided little additional information, stressing that mandatory non-medical masks and proof of vaccination required at university residences are part of the prevention plan for visitors.

Ramsey stressed the importance of getting vaccinated.

“The university understands that people have concerns, the university fully understands that, which is why we have embarked on this program of proof of vaccination and rapid testing,” he said.

However, one area of ​​campus life that this could affect is student society.

The issue of visitors not on the UBC program was raised at the AMS Board on Wednesday evening, when AMS said it would not have a vaccination mandate for its own employees due to legal issues. Some of the AMS employees are not UBC students and therefore are not included in the UBC Immunization Disclosure Program.

Graduate Student Society representative Julia Burnham expressed concern that some AMS employees were not vaccinated and would not be required to undergo rapid tests.

AMS president Cole Evans said the student association felt the program would eventually be expanded to include visitors and everyone on campus.

“We’ll have to get some clarification from UBC as to whether this is something that they are going to eventually implement… or whether we will potentially have to do something ourselves,” he said.


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Afghan boys refuse to go to school in solidarity with female students https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/20/afghan-boys-refuse-to-go-to-school-in-solidarity-with-female-students/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/20/afghan-boys-refuse-to-go-to-school-in-solidarity-with-female-students/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 07:02:21 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/20/afghan-boys-refuse-to-go-to-school-in-solidarity-with-female-students/ The Wall Street Journal reported that many boys would not return until the girls were allowed. “Women are half of society … I will not show up to school until girls’ schools are also open,” said Rohullah, an 18-year-old student in Class 12. The announcement was made by the Taliban Education Ministry and spokesperson Zabihullah […]]]>

The Wall Street Journal reported that many boys would not return until the girls were allowed. “Women are half of society … I will not show up to school until girls’ schools are also open,” said Rohullah, an 18-year-old student in Class 12.

The announcement was made by the Taliban Education Ministry and spokesperson Zabihullah Mujahid said, “All male teachers and students should attend their educational institutions,” not to mention women.

Because of this, few girls were demotivated by the idea of ​​going to school and started to wonder if they should.

Mohammadreza, a school principal, condemned the decision to suppress girls and said: “Girls’ education fixes a generation. The education of boys can affect a family, but the education of girls affects society. We are following the issue very closely. so that girls can go back to school and complete their education. “

The Taliban have already announced their intention to force women and girls to stay at home, as they did during their rule in Afghanistan until 2001.

Amid growing concerns, even the United Nations has expressed concerns about the future of girls in the country.

(With entries from The Wall Street Journal).


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University of Kansas assault complaint sparks student sit-in https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/18/university-of-kansas-assault-complaint-sparks-student-sit-in/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/18/university-of-kansas-assault-complaint-sparks-student-sit-in/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 15:56:58 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/18/university-of-kansas-assault-complaint-sparks-student-sit-in/ LAWRENCE, Kan. (AP) – Dozens of University of Kansas students staged a sit-in outside the chancellor’s office to protest the handling of allegations that a fraternity member sexually assaulted another student. Friday sit-in follows Monday’s protests and Tuesday outside the home of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity. A spokesperson for the fraternity said the organization […]]]>

LAWRENCE, Kan. (AP) – Dozens of University of Kansas students staged a sit-in outside the chancellor’s office to protest the handling of allegations that a fraternity member sexually assaulted another student.

Friday sit-in follows Monday’s protests and Tuesday outside the home of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity. A spokesperson for the fraternity said the organization was made aware of the allegations involving one of its new undergraduate members and the university was immediately notified.

Protesters demand that university officials take action against the fraternity as well as the alleged perpetrator, the Kansas City Star reports.

They changed a sign at the entrance to Chancellor’s office, renaming it “Office of the accomplice”, and stuck other signs with messages on the windows of Chancellor’s office Doug Girod.

Earlier this week, Girod told The Star that the university had sufficient policies in place to address student concerns and that sexual assault was an ongoing academic and cultural problem.

“Things don’t change overnight,” Girod said. “Unfortunately, it’s not limited to the Greek community by any stretch of the imagination, it’s still a challenge across our society. As we are a community of 40,000 people, we reflect our society.


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Historical Society recognizes 20 women who have had an impact on the county | Local News https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/18/historical-society-recognizes-20-women-who-have-had-an-impact-on-the-county-local-news/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/18/historical-society-recognizes-20-women-who-have-had-an-impact-on-the-county-local-news/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/18/historical-society-recognizes-20-women-who-have-had-an-impact-on-the-county-local-news/ Due to COVID-19, Linda Thomas had to delay the selection of “Distinguished Women of Hopkins County” for the Hopkins County Historical Society. Thomas said that normally distinguished women are honored in March to coincide with Women’s History Month, but recognizing the women was difficult because the historical society did not meet. “I guess by Christmas […]]]>

Due to COVID-19, Linda Thomas had to delay the selection of “Distinguished Women of Hopkins County” for the Hopkins County Historical Society.

Thomas said that normally distinguished women are honored in March to coincide with Women’s History Month, but recognizing the women was difficult because the historical society did not meet.

“I guess by Christmas we can meet them and honor them,” she said.

Since 2011, the historical society has recognized around 20 women a year, who have impacted Hopkins County in one way or another, she said. It was started by Judy Adkins, a member of the historical society and historian.

Adkins would create a booklet each year with blurb on each of the women who received the award.

“There are so many women in Hopkins County who have done special things in various ways,” said Thomas.

One of those women is Dr. Cynthia Mason, a professor in the Department of Student Affairs and Counseling at Western Kentucky University.

Mason said she was thrilled to have been chosen as a “Distinguished Woman” in Hopkins County. She was also a little surprised as she hadn’t lived in Hopkins County for over 25 years.

“It means a lot to me and my family,” she said.

She began her career in the Hopkins County public school system as a teacher and rose through the ranks to become a counselor. The most memorable moment in her career was a grant she wrote with the then Hopkins County Superintendent.

“I had spoken to my principal about my concern for the students who weren’t able to join the clubs or take the trips that the clubs took in the spring, and so many things that they didn’t have” , Mason said.

When the grant was approved, it covered student tuition fees, books, supplies, tutoring services, and all school-related travel. When she left Hopkins County schools, that grant was still in the process of being renewed.

Mason said that after thinking about the students, families and community members she worked with, she was happy to accept the honor of being named a Woman of Distinction.

“My family, Western colleagues and friends all know how much my job means to me,” Mason said.

Thomas said that by examining possible “high-profile women,” they looked at women who have excelled in education, in law, as doctors, as politicians, in business and some writers. Some of the women lived in Hopkins County, others were born in the area, but not all remained in the county.

She said they are still trying to contact a few of the women to let them know they have been recognized by historical society and hopes to announce them all by the end of this month.

“As soon as we recognize them, we will have to start in 2022,” Thomas said.

For 2022, she hopes to postpone the recognition until March, so that it is again the same month as Women’s History Month.


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AMS reopens the conversation strategically at September 15 meeting https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/17/ams-reopens-the-conversation-strategically-at-september-15-meeting/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/17/ams-reopens-the-conversation-strategically-at-september-15-meeting/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 05:26:13 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/17/ams-reopens-the-conversation-strategically-at-september-15-meeting/ At the first Mandate Board meeting, the advisers had a lengthy discussion about developing an AMS strategic plan and immunization requirements within the company and the Nest. Try, try, try again (to develop a strategic plan) President Cole Evans, along with former Graduate Student Society President Nicolas Romualdi, presented a new strategy for developing AMS’s […]]]>

At the first Mandate Board meeting, the advisers had a lengthy discussion about developing an AMS strategic plan and immunization requirements within the company and the Nest.

Try, try, try again (to develop a strategic plan)

President Cole Evans, along with former Graduate Student Society President Nicolas Romualdi, presented a new strategy for developing AMS’s strategic plan, after two decades of failed attempts to create one.

“It’s really important to the organization that we have … guidance documents, not necessarily to direct operations, but as a tool for operations to use to ensure that we have a unified approach as that organization of what our values ​​are, what our strategies are and the services we provide to UBC students, ”said Evans.

Most advisers expressed support for the plan, and many said it would be helpful if new advisers and AMS staff really understood what the company is. Artistic advisor Kamil Kanji asked if the council knew why the latest plans had failed.

Evans said the AMS had not done a “post mortem” on past plans, but he believed that was because most of the attempts had been developed by the president’s office, even though the office didn’t lacked the capacity to develop such an important project internally.

Governing Council representative Max Holmes differed on this point, arguing that earlier plans had failed because AMS started working on it mid-year, but stopped working on it when the elections were held. took place. He added that there was no “built-in accountability” to follow a strategic plan with rotation of executives.

“At the end of the day, I think that’s the question people need to ask themselves tonight, is this the only thing you want to do, is this the big project that the whole Council wants to commit to, not just the executive, ”Holmes said.

Romualdi, who would be the person who would lead the development of the plan, said the goal was to make a plan flexible and useful for future leaders and boards.

After a long discussion, he said they would look at what has gone wrong in the past in creating a strategic plan and bring an update to the Council shortly.

AMS received legal advice not to force vaccines on employees

During a discussion on vaccinations, Councilor Katherine Feng asked if AMS has considered mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations for its own employees, given its advocacy for UBC to declare a vaccination mandate on the campus.

Evans said that according to legal counsel, the company is unable to require vaccinations from its existing employees. He added that they thought it might be redundant after UBC’s tenure.

However, UBC technically does not have a vaccine mandate, just rapid testing requirements to be put in place for the unvaccinated.

Graduate Student Society representative Julia Burnham asked if all AMS staff would be covered by UBC’s mandate, as AMS has staff who are not affiliated with the university. Burnham also asked why legal counsel advised AMS against implementing its own vaccine mandate, given that other employers have done so.

Evans said AMS needs to see if UBC also extends its own mandate to visitors to campus. Chief Executive Keith Hester said AMS could technically mandate its own employees to get vaccinated, but could face legal action.

Holmes questioned the consistency of AMS advocacy – why did AMS advocate for UBC to implement a vaccination mandate, if the company was aware of a legal opinion saying that would it be illegal to do so?

“It seems like such a disconnect and just massive hypocrisy in the middle of it, which some people miss. You advocate for the university to require vaccines for everyone, but then you say you can’t do that as an employer, ”Holmes said.

Vice President for Academic and University Affairs Eshana Bhangu acknowledged Holmes’ points.

“We also want to be 100% upfront with you, so we will take all of this into consideration and report back to the Council next time.”


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Lawrence Larson steps down as Dean of Brown’s first engineering school https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/16/lawrence-larson-steps-down-as-dean-of-browns-first-engineering-school/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/16/lawrence-larson-steps-down-as-dean-of-browns-first-engineering-school/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 18:03:30 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/16/lawrence-larson-steps-down-as-dean-of-browns-first-engineering-school/ PROVIDENCE, RI [Brown University] – Lawrence E. Larson, the first dean of Brown University School of Engineering who guided its spectacular growth in its first decade, will step down as dean effective June 30, 2022 to return to teaching and research as a member of the Brown faculty. During his tenure as Dean, Larson oversaw […]]]>

PROVIDENCE, RI [Brown University] – Lawrence E. Larson, the first dean of Brown University School of Engineering who guided its spectacular growth in its first decade, will step down as dean effective June 30, 2022 to return to teaching and research as a member of the Brown faculty.

During his tenure as Dean, Larson oversaw a strong expansion in the number of tenure-track engineering professors, substantial increases in external research funding, the creation of new graduate programs and the construction of a cutting-edge research and teaching center. establishment. University President Richard M. Locke said that by stepping down from the role of Dean, Larson is leaving an indelible legacy at the University.

“Larry far exceeded all expectations, making the young engineering school a leader in the field,” Locke said. “As Provost for the past six years, I have been honored to work closely with Larry and have been impressed by his leadership – his intellectual genius, his collaborative vision and his commitment to excellence. He leaves a lasting legacy, and I couldn’t be more grateful.

“Infinite Possibility,” a student-designed sundial sculpture, was placed on the lawn in front of Brown’s new Engineering Research Center in 2019.

Larson arrived at Brown in 2011, less than a year after the old engineering division was expanded to become the school of engineering. He had been a pioneering researcher in microelectronic technology and wireless communications, and was chairman of the department of electrical and computer engineering at the Jacobs School of Engineering at the University of California, San Diego. At Brown, he was tasked with leading the transition from the Ivy League’s oldest engineering program to a full-fledged engineering school with high impact research and teaching programs.

During his ten-year tenure, Larson has helped raise more than $ 150 million for School of Engineering projects, including the award-winning Engineering Research Center, a research and teaching space of 90,000 square feet which opened in 2017. It has played a vital role in planning the design and construction of the facility, ensuring that it meets the needs of 21st engineering researchers of the century.

“For much of the last century, engineering has focused on the macro-scale – rockets, bridges and giant machines,” Larson said when the new facility opened in 2015. “But today , engineers are increasingly working at the scale of a few atoms. Research at the nanoscale requires entirely new types of facilities, equipment and spaces. “

Image of a research laboratory
ERC’s state-of-the-art laboratories enable 21st century engineering research.

The ERC has 20 laboratory modules designed to support research groups, two state-of-the-art clean rooms and an electron microscopy room. The spaces have been designed to support the school’s long-standing and emerging research strengths, including the Institute for Molecular and Nanoscale Innovation, the Center for Biomedical Engineering, the Superfund Research Program Center and a dynamic research group in mechanics. fluids.

Larson also oversaw a 40% increase in the number of tenure-track engineering professors, which is now the largest in its history. New faculty members expand research in key growth areas such as biomedical and environmental engineering, and strengthen long-standing strengths in mechanical engineering, electrical and computer engineering, chemical engineering, as well as science materials. External research funding has almost doubled over the past 10 years and now stands at around $ 24 million per year.

Increased support for graduate students and community engagement

Larson is committed to engaging directly with donors to gain support for the school, and his fundraising efforts have helped establish nine new endowed chairs as well as expanded graduate and postdoctoral fellowships.

“Larry is such an open and friendly leader who integrated into engineering so easily that it can be easy to forget how much he has guided the school since 2010,” said Rod Beresford, professor of engineering at Brown since 1990. “A true collaborative academic colleague, Larry immediately understood the special blend of engaged learners, interdisciplinary projects and consensus-based governance in engineering at Brown. None of that has changed, but we’ve made giant strides that many thought were unlikely at the time, especially in fundraising, faculty building and research, expanding into a fantastic new facility. and attracting a larger and more diverse flow of graduate students. . “

The school’s graduate programs doubled enrollment during Larson’s tenure, and he oversaw the creation of three new master’s programs in technology leadership, design engineering and engineering, and computer science based on them. data. Other student-centric projects include the creation of the Brown Design Workshop, a premier creative space at Prince Lab that has nearly 1,000 regular users from all parts of the campus and the community. It now serves as the hub for our joint master’s program with the Rhode Island School of Design and as an undergraduate education center for a wide range of on-campus programs including engineering, computer science, arts and crafts. theater and others.


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How today’s students could shape the future of the healthcare workforce https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/15/how-todays-students-could-shape-the-future-of-the-healthcare-workforce/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/15/how-todays-students-could-shape-the-future-of-the-healthcare-workforce/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 09:00:51 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/15/how-todays-students-could-shape-the-future-of-the-healthcare-workforce/ How is the COVID-19 pandemic affecting students? And what will be the effects in the end when they enter the labor market? University professors, including psychologists, are concerned. Suzanne Chong is a psychologist at Ursinus College and founder of Clarity and Insight Counseling Services. Born and raised in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, she uses her knowledge […]]]>

How is the COVID-19 pandemic affecting students? And what will be the effects in the end when they enter the labor market? University professors, including psychologists, are concerned.

Suzanne Chong is a psychologist at Ursinus College and founder of Clarity and Insight Counseling Services. Born and raised in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, she uses her knowledge of immigration in her professional work with culturally informed practices that emphasize health equity and respect for individual identities.

In this interview, which has been edited for clarity and brevity, she talks about what’s in store for the workforce with a focus on medical students and medical students today.

They go through a lot, let’s put it that way. They are living alone for the first time. For many of them who move away from home, they navigate a whole new social climate. Some of them are going to be in schools where they don’t know many people. You know, there are pros and cons whether you are on a large campus or a small campus. But anyway, it’s that experience of leaving home.

There is certainly this greater awareness of their responsibility and the financial burden of entering college. The cost of tuition and living expenses has skyrocketed and exploded over the years. And that does not match the earnings and incomes of many families. In the past, you could work a summer job and then pay the tuition for the next two semesters. And you could go back to your summer job and take on a part-time job while browsing and juggling college. It’s not the same. It is simply not possible. And that seems to stress the students.

[RL: For medical students, the situation is daunting. 80% carry an average debt of more than $200,000 at medical school graduation. For many medical students, it takes more than a decade to pay off this debt.]

First of all, adolescence and early adulthood are the times when people start to forge an identity. And we learn who we are greatly through our relationships with others. In today’s world, entering into relationships is through social media. There is a tendency to just meet people online, or through the screen or not to meet in person but by text. And we are certainly seeing a change where students are taking less risk in their social relationships.

The culture of actually being there and doing things is slowly fading away because of phones and technology. And I think, in some ways, it could really dampen the spontaneity of forming social relationships, like just hanging out or being together in person.

that’s a big question. Due to the delay in forming social relationships due to social media, I wonder if it is now the role of schools to incorporate lessons, such as: How do we talk to people? What are the guidelines of social etiquette? Sometimes we see emails and texts from younger generations and it strikes us as follows: is there anything missing in their use of language, grammar, appropriate level of formality and professionalism?

I think how much we as adults are able to appreciate the change that is happening, to step in and work with our students in such a way that they can hear us. I wonder, will we be more flexible in how we approach our next generation?

Yes, I think so. It emerged, for example, with new words and phrases and an ever-changing language. I think it’s fascinating and I learn so much from them: the words we use and how it could be so fluid to talk with peers.

However, if you are a future employer and you are not part of that culture, it is quite possible that people will feel that new hires are not able to communicate. And what do we do with it? Do we just insist that students adapt to the way we speak and / or do we adapt to them and their language?

I hope what the students saw – in terms of the inequities exhibited in our society – will ignite generations of grassroots activism. These are students who are ready to go out and say, No, we don’t accept that.

In the short term, there is a sense of loss, a collective sense of loss and grief that we haven’t really addressed yet. You know, a lot of milestones that our students assume is going to have been taken and it was out of their control. What also concerns me is that we are going to see an increasing prevalence of mental health diagnoses like PTSD and depressive disorders.

For the students, the whole period is terrifying, out of control and as if there is nothing we can do about it. There are things we can do. But a pandemic makes us feel that life is very fleeting and fragile, and therefore hopeless. And that’s not what we want.

There is certainly a feeling of mistrust. I would say that is the root of it. Can we trust the information we get? Can we trust that the company or those in charge are watching over us?

It might also be a bit early to tell as we are welcoming a new class this fall. If I had to predict and speculate, I think there is a feeling of mistrust, of distrust of the adults in charge, that they can trust the information they get. So there is also this fear that they will feel that they are superfluous and disposable, and, again, that they are somehow left behind by maybe the mistakes of society.

Students want to see employers who are more transparent, employers who can actually talk about how they take care of their employees. College-aged students may want to know if there have been any allegations of misconduct and how these are handled.

How do employers react when employees express their dissatisfaction with the current work situation? Are these situations swept under the rug? Or do they take it seriously? What is the company doing about global issues? What are their values? And do the behaviors and actions of the company and employees match the values ​​they say they follow?

I mean to employers that while you are interviewing potential employees, have a collaborative interview. Be open about your employee’s background to learn about their background and background.

College students can be a bit unfiltered. Be prepared to take on the role of: Where can I offer feedback? Can I contextualize what is going on? For my part, as an employee of a higher education institution, I wish I could work more with students to prepare them for the world, whatever it is, while getting to know them better.

Resa E. Lewiss is an emergency physician at Thomas Jefferson University and professor of emergency medicine and radiology, and host of Visible Voices, a podcast dedicated to health care equity and current trends.

The Future of Work is produced with support from the William Penn Foundation and the Lenfest Institute for Journalism. Editorial content is created independently of project donors.


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The Post-September 11 Generation: Too Young to Remember, But Not to Think About | New https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/11/the-post-september-11-generation-too-young-to-remember-but-not-to-think-about-new/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/11/the-post-september-11-generation-too-young-to-remember-but-not-to-think-about-new/#respond Sat, 11 Sep 2021 05:11:37 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/11/the-post-september-11-generation-too-young-to-remember-but-not-to-think-about-new/ For those who were alive on September 11, 2001, the memory of that day is often still vivid and moving, the images of the Twin Towers falling forever etched in people’s minds. For a whole generation of young people, however, September 11 is not a memory at all. It’s part of the story. As we […]]]>

For those who were alive on September 11, 2001, the memory of that day is often still vivid and moving, the images of the Twin Towers falling forever etched in people’s minds.

For a whole generation of young people, however, September 11 is not a memory at all. It’s part of the story.

As we celebrate two decades since the deadliest terrorist attack in U.S. history, teens are coming of age in a world reshaped by an event that happened before they were born.

“My parents saw thousands of people die in a surprise attack. They lost a lot,” said Cole Sturino, a high school student from Palo Alto High School.

“For us, that’s how it went.”

To explore what it’s been like to grow up in a post 9/11 world, this news organization spoke with five local teenagers about their perspective on the 9/11 attacks and the impact on their lives. Here are their stories.

When a senior asks 17-year-old Zack Silver how old he is, the follow-up question is often the same: “Oh, so you don’t remember 9/11?” “

Born in 2004, Paly’s eldest said he didn’t know the first time he learned of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. It has always been a part of life.

“The obvious emotion that we haven’t felt is the shock,” Silver said. “For us, it was always something that happened, not something that happened.”

Although he was not alive at the time, Silver said he knew that this day played a significant role in changing the current situation in the United States and the world at large.

“Even if we weren’t there for that, you can absolutely see the effects,” said Silver.

This ranges from going through airport security to growing up watching the US wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. To many of his generation, Silver said the Middle East has always been known as the place where the terrorists who perpetrated 9/11 came from. It’s sad, Silver said, because only a small number of people carried out the attacks and there is so much more in the area.

“Since then the United States has in many ways been the police of the world and I’m not sure that’s a good thing,” he said.

Zainab Ali was born just one month after September 11. His parents had recently left Pakistan for the United States in search of employment opportunities. Her mother has since told Ali about the fear she felt as a Muslim in the days following the attack.

“I remember my mother telling me that she was afraid to give birth in the hospital,” Ali said. “She was afraid that the doctors would treat her differently because we are Muslims.”

Although Ali said that luckily this had not happened, she grew up seeing the impact of 9/11 on how Muslims are viewed in the United States. When someone brings up terrorism, they frequently link them to Islam, she said.

“As a Muslim student, every year I would kind of dread 9/11,” she said. “People look at you whenever the subject of Muslims or Islam is brought up.”

His teachers were generally careful to make it clear that Muslims are not to blame, Ali said, adding that over the years people have become more understanding.

Now preparing to start her sophomore year at Foothill College, Ali is the co-chair of the Muslim Students’ Association on campus and speaks at this year’s Multi-Faith Peace Picnic on September 11 in Palo Alto.

“I wanted to be more involved in the community,” Ali said. “I think it’s really cool that we bring people of all faiths together.”

Twenty years from now, Jacob Howmiller said he wonders if society will think about the coronavirus pandemic in the same way as current memories of 9/11 – as a world-changing event that some people are too young for. even remember.

“It’s never really the same to live in it, rather to hear about it afterwards,” Howmiller said. “You can never really experience it if you don’t live there right now.”

Currently in senior year at Los Altos High School, Howmiller was born four years after September 11. He can’t remember a time when he wasn’t aware of the attacks.

“Ever since I remember … and have conscious memories of myself, I feel like I already knew about 9/11 – a rough idea of ​​what happened,” a- he declared.

This may be in part because her grandfather’s birthday falls on September 11, so the family would mark the anniversary every year.

When Howmiller reads the stories of September 11, he says, he was struck by the courage and bravery of the first responders. Despite the tragedy, he said there were bright spots – including the national solidarity it created, as well as the focus on preventing another attack.

“It brought America together,” Howmiller said. “It was when American morale was at its highest.”

When 9/11 is brought up at school, Cole Sturino said his teachers always try to make the class understand the magnitude of the tragedy, knowing that the students don’t have the same visceral association with the day.

It is considered a “hammer blow,” Sturino said, with people alive at the time remembering exactly where they were and what they were doing when they found it. He said it’s similar to how his grandparents or great-grandparents can remember JFK’s assassination.

“I don’t think my generation has really had that moment yet,” Sturino said.

His father told him the story of being on vacation in Germany at the time and walking around a town square when he heard a report on the radio that the Twin Towers had been attacked.

Without the vacation, Sturino said his father likely would have seen the plane hit the Pentagon because he was working in Washington, DC at the time. After the attacks, two of his cousins ​​joined the army.

Sturino said he knew there were parts of 9/11 that his generation did not understand, but added that their youth allows them to see its impact “without being clouded by this need to fight back against the people who we are. have injured “.

“It was never our fight,” he added.

Sturino said he knew there had to be justice and a response to the killing of innocent people, but didn’t believe the United States should have gone to war, let alone stayed in the region for two decades.

The first time Yonu Oh, a junior at the Castilleja school, really remembers learning about the 9/11 attacks was when she and her family visited the 9/11 museum and memorial in New York City. About the fifth year at the time, Oh said she realized the importance of the day.

“The plethora of names written on the black base was a huge shock to me – lives were gone in the blink of an eye,” Oh wrote in an email.

The memorial stands on the site where the Twin Towers once stood and features the names, inscribed in bronze, of 2,983 people killed. Seeing this monument and viewing artifacts from the attacks in the museum helped her contextualize what 9/11 had meant for the nation.

A few years ago, as she reflected on a 9/11 anniversary with her mother, Oh said her mother told her the story of flying to New York on the day of the attacks, only so that the plane is forced to turn. about. While Oh and her peers might not have those kind of first-hand memories, she believes her generation’s role is to keep remembering what happened.

“We still carry this legacy,” Oh said.


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Big Time (Virtual) Rush: Students Reflect On Community Aspects And Falls Of Greek Life As Hybrid Recruitment Begins https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/08/big-time-virtual-rush-students-reflect-on-community-aspects-and-falls-of-greek-life-as-hybrid-recruitment-begins/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/08/big-time-virtual-rush-students-reflect-on-community-aspects-and-falls-of-greek-life-as-hybrid-recruitment-begins/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 03:57:00 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/09/08/big-time-virtual-rush-students-reflect-on-community-aspects-and-falls-of-greek-life-as-hybrid-recruitment-begins/ With around a third of Duke’s undergraduate population involved in Greek life, sororities and fraternities have long been an important part of Duke. Students wishing to be a part of the action must go through the emergency process, consisting of many activities and events, until they finally receive an offer to join an organization. Pan-Hellenic […]]]>

With around a third of Duke’s undergraduate population involved in Greek life, sororities and fraternities have long been an important part of Duke. Students wishing to be a part of the action must go through the emergency process, consisting of many activities and events, until they finally receive an offer to join an organization.

Pan-Hellenic recruiting will be completely virtual and will take place from September 9 to 12 and September 17 to 19. Recruitment for the Duke Interfraternity Council will be a hybrid of in-person and virtual events, which began on Wednesday and will end on September 14.

Events with more than 50 attendees must be outdoor or virtual, per Duke’s new policy announced on August 30.

The Pan-Hellenic National Council, which brings together historically black sororities and fraternities, and Greek Multicultural Council organizations will follow similar guidelines and recommendations, according to Shruti Desai, associate vice president of student affairs for campus life.

“Student Leadership Office staff work closely with all recognized fellowship and sisterhood chapters on planning their events, related to admission / recruiting and others,” Desai added.

While some students are thrilled to join a community, others are wary of some of the important features of Greek life.

Sophomore Zoe Ali plans to rush out to test the waters and see what the experience would entail.

“I’m really weary of some of the inadvertent classist habits that there have been in previous years, so as someone who fully funds their own college experience, this is definitely a caveat that I have,” he said. Ali said.

Sophomore Rhiannon Eplett also enters the rush process with trepidation. Eplett cites his concern as an acknowledgment that “the outcome is almost entirely out of my control.”

As a potential new member with no family ties to Greek life, Eplett is curious about the process and realizes that “rushing a sorority or really any kind of SLG is a once in a lifetime opportunity. There will never be another time in our lives when you get the chance to join that guy or that organization where their focus is almost entirely social.

“After a really isolated and difficult year I’m still looking for a really developed sense of community on campus without wondering if I belong or not, a whole bunch of new friendships and a pre-curated social calendar . Said Eplet. “And if I don’t see myself finding these things by the end of the next two weekends with one of the chapters on campus, then I’ll miss out on committing.”

The early years, who are not eligible to participate in Selective Life Group Recruitment under University policy, had a variety of opinions on the process.

Freshman Sydney Chen thinks sorority leaders are more to blame than sororities as a system for things like drinking.

“Drinking can be one of the [the problems], I think it’s up to the leaders to determine that, to regulate that. It is to them. They have to take responsibility, ”Chen said.

While Chen doesn’t plan on rushing sororities, she does believe there are pros and cons to Greek life.

“It’s the community that they bring,” Chen said. “But the rushed process can be a little depressing for those who don’t fit in.”

While some students view sororities as a positive way to build community on campus, organizations like Abolish Duke IFC and Panhel have criticized Greek life.

Chen disagrees with the idea of ​​abolishing Greek life in college and says Greek life creates communities for children who struggle to find friends.

Grade 1 Joey Ilagan agreed with Chen and found the possibility of abolishing Greek life a “long shot”.

Freshman Ashley Chaionn also found the goals of the Abolish movement “a bit too extreme” and felt they should be held up to higher standards of conduct.

“If you break X number of things, you break that number of rules, let in that number of people, then you shouldn’t be able to operate under Duke,” Chaionn said.

Nonetheless, Ilagan says he finds it permissible to advocate for change, especially in terms of pandemic protocol.

“It’s an obvious fact that they were a hotspot for COVID,” Ilagan said. “It is still a current threat.”

Ilagan, however, says he still hopes to join a fraternity in the future and finds the sororities to be worth the experience.

“I think they can be wonderful organizations,” Ilagan said. “But of course they have problems.”

Although Chaionn did not formally rush a Greek organization, she compared the experience of rushing to her experience of rushing in the pre-professional company Scale and Coin.

“I think [rushing processes] are good at meeting new people and being able to socialize with people with similar interests, ”said Chaionn. “At least for me, I’ve never been in a position where I was uncomfortable with anything.”

Chaionn also acknowledges that there are some problems with “more traditional sororities”.

“Especially since a lot of them tend to be geared towards excluding certain members of certain communities, I think that’s a big deal,” Chaionn said.


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