Student Society – USC PRSSA http://uscprssa.com/ Fri, 04 Jun 2021 20:55:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://uscprssa.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Student Society – USC PRSSA http://uscprssa.com/ 32 32 Rotary Club of Alton-Godfrey selects the students of the month | Riverbend News https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/04/rotary-club-of-alton-godfrey-selects-the-students-of-the-month-riverbend-news/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/04/rotary-club-of-alton-godfrey-selects-the-students-of-the-month-riverbend-news/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 20:34:00 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/04/rotary-club-of-alton-godfrey-selects-the-students-of-the-month-riverbend-news/ Alton High School students Sydney Brunaugh and Jimmeilia Patterson were honored as Students of the Month for May at the regular Alton-Godfrey Rotary Club reunion at Gentelin’s Restaurant. Students selected for this honor are recognized and awarded at a Rotary club meeting and may compete for a $ 6,000 scholarship which will be awarded to […]]]>


Alton High School students Sydney Brunaugh and Jimmeilia Patterson were honored as Students of the Month for May at the regular Alton-Godfrey Rotary Club reunion at Gentelin’s Restaurant.

Students selected for this honor are recognized and awarded at a Rotary club meeting and may compete for a $ 6,000 scholarship which will be awarded to one of the monthly students during the school year.

Brunaugh is the daughter of Jason and Nikki Brunaugh from Alton. She is a member of the National Honor Society.

She has a GPA of 4.385 on a 4.0 scale, which places her in the top 5% of the senior class, and she was named the silver medalist. She was elected treasurer of Mu Alpha Theta, the honor society of mathematics. She also participated in the Saturday Scholars and the Physics Club. In the first year, she was named student of the year in digital photography.

She has a passion for football. At AHS, she was a member of the varsity team for all four years and was named team captain for her junior and senior seasons. She has been playing since the age of 3 and has also played in many club teams.

Brunaugh and her family participated in Sleep in Heavenly Peace, a nonprofit organization that builds beds for children in need. His father started the Alton chapter. She has been addicted to this operation ever since she had her first home birth and saw the look on the child’s face.

Brunaugh will attend Iowa State University to earn a degree in architecture. She hopes to continue playing soccer at the intramural or club level.

Patterson is the niece of Dennis and Deidre Moore of Alton. She is a member of the CEO program, coordinated by the Riverbend Growth Association.

She was very active in the activities at Alton High School, but continued to take more specialization courses as she progressed as a student in the upper class.

She did cross country and was on the track team. However, her main sport has been women’s basketball. She was the MVP of the team, the Scholar Athlete and was named Riverbender Athlete of the Month. In addition to athletics, she also participated in the student council and the book club.

She was also involved in tutoring from Kindergarten to Grade 3. Through her aunt, she also got involved in the My Sister’s Keeper program. This program led her to help distribute covid protection items, especially to widows, children and those in need.

Even with this busy schedule, she held a variety of jobs throughout high school including the Godfrey Corn Maze, West Alton Firework Tent, Taco Bell, and Walmart.

After graduation, she plans to attend Tennessee State University in Nashville with the intention of becoming a labor and delivery nurse. She eventually finds herself involved in real estate, renting houses.

The students received plaques of recognition from Andy Bowen, president of the Alton-Godfrey Rotary Club.



Source link

]]>
https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/04/rotary-club-of-alton-godfrey-selects-the-students-of-the-month-riverbend-news/feed/ 0
Top 2021 Seniors Named in West Iron County | News, Sports, Jobs https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/04/top-2021-seniors-named-in-west-iron-county-news-sports-jobs/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/04/top-2021-seniors-named-in-west-iron-county-news-sports-jobs/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 05:45:18 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/04/top-2021-seniors-named-in-west-iron-county-news-sports-jobs/ IRON RIVER – The West Iron County School District has announced its top 2021 class. They are: – Mitchell Ballinger, promotion major, is the son of Timmothy and Michelle Ballinger of Iron River. Throughout the eight semesters of high school, he was on the A Honor Roll and maintained a cumulative grade point average of […]]]>


IRON RIVER – The West Iron County School District has announced its top 2021 class.

They are:

– Mitchell Ballinger, promotion major, is the son of Timmothy and Michelle Ballinger of Iron River. Throughout the eight semesters of high school, he was on the A Honor Roll and maintained a cumulative grade point average of 3.97. Ballinger was the senior class president and competed in both tennis and basketball for all four years. Within the community he has been a part of the Key Club for the past two years as a volunteer in various activities and has also worked at his family’s restaurant, Mr. T’s, for the past three years. He plans to major in neuroscience at Michigan State University.

-Thomas “Bink” Cline is the son of Dr Steven and Mary Anne Cline of Iron River. He has lived in Iron River for the past 12 years and attended West Iron County schools all the time. Cline was on the football, tennis and track teams. As a junior he was elected to the National Honor Society and joined the Key Club to be part of community service organizations. This year he was President of the Forestry Club and hosted the Iron Lake Fishing Tournament. He also worked at Angeli’s Foods in Iron River for almost two years. He plans to earn a bachelor’s degree in biochemistry and biotechnology from Michigan State University.

– Ella Maloney is the daughter of Pete and Denise Maloney of Iron River. She was on the A Honor Roll throughout high school and was Student of the Week in her senior year. Maloney was secretary of the local National Honor Society and was a member of the Key Club, Spanish Club, and student council, in addition to being class vice president for the past two years. She played volleyball and golf and was part of the dance team. Maloney has volunteered at the Iron County Youth Camp, Vacation Bible School, WIC Annual 5K Color Run, and WIC Preschool Class. She has also done all the stats for the varsity and varsity girls junior basketball teams for the past four years. Maloney plans to study at Michigan State University this fall to become a speech-language pathologist and earn a minor in Spanish.

THOMAS CLINE

– Zoe Kolenda is the daughter of Brian Cascioli and Grace Kolenda of Iron River. She was a member of the student council, vice-president of the Forest Club, a member of the National Honor Society, and a recipient of the Bausch and Lomb Science award. Kolenda has competed in cross country, basketball and track and field. Outside of school, she was part of the UP River Church youth group. She plans to major in nursing at the University of Michigan to become a nurse practitioner.

– Justin Nelson is the son of Larry and Teresa Nelson of Iron River. He had a GPA of 3.86, made the A Honor Roll for seven semesters, and received academic awards through high school. Nelson was on the basketball team and the Forestry Club. Community involvement included roadside cleanup in Bates Township and vacation Bible school at Iron River Bible Church. Nelson plans to earn an associate’s degree in water resources management at Bay de Noc Community College, where he will also play basketball.

– Avery Bociek is the daughter of Scott and Heidi Bociek of Iron River. She did cross country, track and field, basketball and club Spanish throughout her high school years. Bociek was selected for the National Honor Society as a junior. Community involvement has included helping the Holiday Bible School at Grace Covenant Church and making door tags for residents of the Iron County Medicare Facility. She plans to study speech therapy and speech therapy this fall at Grand Valley State University.

– Danielle Polzin of Iron River is the daughter of Dale Polzin and Debra Cieslinski. Academic accomplishments throughout high school include enrollment in the A Honor Roll and being chosen as Student of the Week as a Senior. She played volleyball in her four years of high school, was a member of the Forestry Club, and editor of the yearbook. Polzin belongs to the Lutheran Church of Saint Paul. She plans to attend Northern Michigan University this fall.

– Marly Mattson is the daughter of Jason and Sharon Mattson from Iron River. She has been part of the History Club since 2017 and was selected as a junior for the National Honor Society. Mattson plans to study computer networking this fall at Bay College.

ELLA MALONEY

– Lucas Stuart Isaacson is the son of Kevin and Tina Isaacson of Iron River. He has been a member of the basketball team, the tennis team, the Forest Club, the Business Club and the Hiawatha Trap Club. Isaacson received the Student of the Week Award, the WIC High School Academic Award, and the Multimedia Student of the Semester Award. He plans to seek a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering at Michigan Technological University.

– Stephanie Wiegand is the daughter of Steven and Kathy Wiegand from Iron River. In high school, she was on the honor roll and in the top 10. Wiegand was involved in Symphony (piano); selected to the National Honor Society, where she was president; and belonged to the Forest Club, Communities That Care and Key Club. She also practiced athletics and golf. Outside of school, Wiegand volunteered with the American Legion and its church, St. Cecilia. She plans to earn a bachelor’s degree in geological engineering from Michigan Tech University.

ZOE KOLENDA

JUSTIN NELSON

AVERY BOCIEK

DANIELLE POLZIN

MARLY MATTSON

LUCAS ISAACSON

STEPHANIE WIEGAND

The latest news today and more in your inbox



Source link

]]>
https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/04/top-2021-seniors-named-in-west-iron-county-news-sports-jobs/feed/ 0
Tara Hill to lead Habitat for Humanity in Greater Portland https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/03/tara-hill-to-lead-habitat-for-humanity-in-greater-portland/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/03/tara-hill-to-lead-habitat-for-humanity-in-greater-portland/#respond Thu, 03 Jun 2021 08:00:02 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/03/tara-hill-to-lead-habitat-for-humanity-in-greater-portland/ NEW EMPLOYEES Hill of Tara Habitat for Humanity Greater Portland announced Hill of Tara as the new CEO of the non-profit housing organization. Hill will lead the Habitat team in achieving its mission of bringing people together to build homes, communities and hope. She is a strategic and innovative leader who has developed flourishing organizations […]]]>


NEW EMPLOYEES

Hill of Tara

Habitat for Humanity Greater Portland announced Hill of Tara as the new CEO of the non-profit housing organization. Hill will lead the Habitat team in achieving its mission of bringing people together to build homes, communities and hope. She is a strategic and innovative leader who has developed flourishing organizations thanks to her creativity and vision. Previously, she was Executive Director of Habitat for Humanity / 7 Rivers Maine and Maine Cancer Foundation, and most recently, she was Director of Community Development at Town & Country Federal Credit Union. Hill will start working at Habitat on Monday. The affiliate is currently working on a community of three homes in Freeport.

Robb atkinson

MEMIC welcomes Robb atkinson to the company in his new role as Senior Public Relations and Communications Specialist. Atkinson brings to this role extensive expertise in public relations, marketing strategy and content development. As CNN’s senior director of sales and affiliate relations, he has managed sales, products and services for more than 100 television stations nationwide. Prior to CNN, he was news director for WGME Television in Portland; WATE Television in Knoxville, Tennessee; and WWAY TV in Wilmington, North Carolina; awarded two Emmy Awards for investigative reporting.

Dakin hewlett

Maine Seacoast Mission announced the addition of Dakin hewlett as the Journey program manager. The Mission EdGE Journey program is a beneficiary of the Emanuel and Pauline A. Lerner Foundation Aspirations Incubator, which focuses on mentoring, support and working alongside young people and their families; offering opportunities for leadership, community involvement and travel. Previously, Hewlett was the Watershed Education Coordinator for the Delaware Nature Society, where she developed and implemented two youth programs.

Diane Lamprey

Cindy mckenna

Portside Real Estate Group welcomed licensed real estate agents Diane Lamprey and Cindy mckenna to its growing team serving the coast of Maine and New Hampshire.

Lamprey, from York, joins Portside Real Estate Group as an Associate Broker. Lamprey has served real estate clients in New Hampshire and Maine for the past four years, following a career spanning more than 20 years as a Sales Account Manager for a Fortune 500 company.

McKenna, also from York, joins Portside Real Estate Group as an associate broker. Originally from Boston, she has been a licensed real estate agent in Maine for 17 years and passionately supports her local community as a member of the York County Council of Realtors and York Rotary Community Service Committee.

Amran Osman

Amran Osman joined Gateway Community Services Maine as the Portland Community Resources Coordinator. Amran graduated from the University of Southern Maine in May with a bachelor’s degree in political science with a major in international studies. At USM, she served as Director of Racial Equity and Inclusion for Student Government, Chair of the Student Senate Committee on Racial Equity, Vice-Chair of the Suburban Student Association, co-founder of the African Student Union and Model of the United Nations, and Advertising Manager for the Muslim Student Association. Over the past year, she has also been a leader of the Gateway Youth Coalition.

Julia broulidakis

Julia broulidakis joined the Portland law firm FordMurray as an immigration attorney. She brings extensive immigration experience to the FordMurray team, having worked as a paralegal at a Boston immigration law firm and as a student lawyer at the Refugee and Human Rights Clinic. . Broulidakis graduated in 2020 from the University of Maine Law and graduated in 2015 from Bates College.

Belinda Ray will join the Greater Portland Council of Governments (GPCOG) as the agency’s director of strategic partnerships. Ray was a member of the board of directors of the GPCOG executive committee, and was also president of the GPCOG last year. She helped shape the plans for Transit Tomorrow and served on the PACTS executive committee, and will begin her work for GPCOG in January following the end of her tenure on Portland City Council. Following her hiring, she immediately leaves her position as a member of the GPCOG executive committee.

AWARDS AND HONORS

Tom keller

At the annual meeting of the National Council of State Science Inspectors (CS3), Tom keller of STEM Education Strategies LLC, based in Newcastle, received the prestigious CJ Evans Award. This award, sponsored by Texas Instruments, is presented annually to the individual who has provided exceptional service to the field and to the organization. The recipient of the award is determined by the CS3 Board of Directors and Keller received the award from the hands of President, Kevin Anderson of Wisconsin. His unwavering support for new members of the organization and his constant willingness to help the President and the Board of Directors have contributed to its success. Keller is a past president and treasurer of the organization and served as state science supervisor in Maine for 18 years.

PROMOTIONS

Mark Stasium

Camden National Bank recently promoted Mark Stasium to Senior Vice President, Director of Commercial Real Estate Banking. With over 30 years of commercial banking experience, he is an expert in commercial real estate lending and relationship management. For the past six years, he has served as Senior Vice President, Commercial Real Estate Banker at Camden National. Stasium is actively involved in the local community and is currently Treasurer of the Board of Directors of the Maine Real Estate & Development Association (MEREDA), where he received the 2020 Volunteer of the Year award. Based out of Camden National’s office in Portland, Stasium lives in Portland with his family.

Please send your submissions to [email protected]



Source link

]]>
https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/03/tara-hill-to-lead-habitat-for-humanity-in-greater-portland/feed/ 0
Vertical Flight Society Announces Winners of First Design-Build-Vertical-Flight Student Competition https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/02/vertical-flight-society-announces-winners-of-first-design-build-vertical-flight-student-competition/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/02/vertical-flight-society-announces-winners-of-first-design-build-vertical-flight-student-competition/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 11:44:23 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/02/vertical-flight-society-announces-winners-of-first-design-build-vertical-flight-student-competition/ The Vertical Flight Society announces today the winners of its inaugural Design-Build-Vertical-Flight (DBVF) competition. The University of Michigan took first place with a prize of $ 2,000. The University of Maryland team took second place and Ohio State University took third place; teams will receive cash prizes of $ 1,000 and $ 500, respectively. The […]]]>


The Vertical Flight Society announces today the winners of its inaugural Design-Build-Vertical-Flight (DBVF) competition. The University of Michigan took first place with a prize of $ 2,000. The University of Maryland team took second place and Ohio State University took third place; teams will receive cash prizes of $ 1,000 and $ 500, respectively.

The DBVF Electric Remote-Controlled Vertical Take-Off and Landing (eVTOL) competition aims to encourage interest in unmanned aircraft technology and the design and manufacture of small aerial vehicles. The competition is designed to develop practical skills and familiarization with eVTOL and Advanced Air Mobility (AAM) technology at the university student level, helping to prepare the next generation of engineers and leaders to push the boundaries of this exciting technology. in the future.

Although the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic forced the fly-off portion of the competition to be canceled, each team submitted a final technical report and made a virtual presentation of their design and findings to a jury. April 15 and 16.

A total of seven academic teams submitted applications for this year’s competition. The 2020-2021 Request for Proposals (RFP) challenged teams to build a general aircraft, with requirements limited to the Group 1 Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS), which limited the Maximum Take-Off Weight (MTOW) to not more than 20 lbs (9.1 kilograms). The call for tenders and other information are available at http://www.vtol.org/fly.

The winning teams are:

1st: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States, Michigan Vertical Flight Technology
2nd: University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, United States, micro-aerial autonomous vehicle
3rd: Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, United States, Buckeye Vertical

The other teams received the following honorable mentions from the judges:

Best Drawing Package: McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aero McGill
The most creative: Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, United States, Beaverhawks 3.0
Best Computer Simulation: Pennsylvania State University, State College, Pennsylvania, United States. Autonomous robotics club
Most manufacturable: Vaughn College of Aeronautics and Technology. Flushing, New York, United States, Vaughn UAV

A total of $ 5,500 was awarded by VFS during the competition. In addition to the $ 3,500 in final rewards, $ 2,000 had already been awarded. In December 2020, each of the seven teams submitted a preliminary design report. The results of the judgment at the time were as follows:

1st place: University of Michigan ($ 750)
2nd place (tie): Oregon State University ($ 500) and Ohio State University ($ 500)
3rd place: University of Maryland ($ 250)

“All of the student teams did a really impressive job,” said VFS Executive Director Mike Hirschberg. “Not only did they come up with exciting aircraft designs that had to meet the demanding demands of the competition, but they also had to deal with all the restrictions and uncertainties caused by COVID-19. They are now better prepared to design real rotorcraft and eVTOL aircraft. “

VFS intended to hold the competition during the same period on the Robotics Research Collaborative Campus of the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) of the U.S. Army Combat Capability Development Command ( DEVCOM) near Aberdeen, Maryland. ARL signed a five-year educational partnership agreement with VFS earlier this year to host the event and collaborate on vertical flight education awareness initiatives. Over the past year, the ARL has done important work in preparing for the flight competition, including extensive planning for flight tests in April under COVID-19 restrictions. The Society is grateful for the support of the United States Army for this important educational initiative.

The Vertical Flight Society encourages universities around the world to form teams and participate in this exciting and challenging competition next year. Preparations are already underway, with the flight test portion of the competition scheduled for the ARL R2C2 site next spring. Details will be announced this summer.

The Vertical Flight Society is the world’s premier technical vertical flight society. Since its founding as the American Helicopter Society in 1943, the Society has been a major force in the advancement of vertical flight. VFS is the global information resource for vertical flight technology. For more than 75 years, he has provided global leadership in scientific, technical, educational and legislative initiatives that advance the state of the art of vertical flight.



Source link

]]>
https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/02/vertical-flight-society-announces-winners-of-first-design-build-vertical-flight-student-competition/feed/ 0
Virginia professor begins term as 2021-2022 president of the National Science Teaching Association https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/01/virginia-professor-begins-term-as-2021-2022-president-of-the-national-science-teaching-association/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/01/virginia-professor-begins-term-as-2021-2022-president-of-the-national-science-teaching-association/#respond Tue, 01 Jun 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/01/virginia-professor-begins-term-as-2021-2022-president-of-the-national-science-teaching-association/ ARLINGTON, Virginia – (BUSINESS WIRE) – June 1, Dr. Eric J. Pyle, professor of geoscience education at James Madison University (JMU) in Harrisonburg, Va., Became the 2021-2022 president of the National Science Teaching Association (NSTA), the world’s largest professional organization to the world promoting excellence and innovation in the teaching and learning of science for […]]]>


ARLINGTON, Virginia – (BUSINESS WIRE) – June 1, Dr. Eric J. Pyle, professor of geoscience education at James Madison University (JMU) in Harrisonburg, Va., Became the 2021-2022 president of the National Science Teaching Association (NSTA), the world’s largest professional organization to the world promoting excellence and innovation in the teaching and learning of science for all.

At James Madison University, Pyle works with science professors and future geoscience professionals, providing courses and research opportunities in the areas of Earth and Planet Science and Science education. He also has extensive experience teaching field science both in the US, Ireland and the UK. He received a BS in Earth Sciences from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte in 1983, an MA in Geology from Emory University in 1986, and a PhD. in Science Education from the University of Georgia in 1995.

A committed leader in science and STEM education for decades, Pyle has held leadership positions for the Virginia Association of Science Teachers (VAST); the National Association of Geoscience Teachers; the Association for the Training of Science Teachers (ASTE); the National Association of Earth Science Teachers (NESTA); and the Geological Society of America (GSA). Pyle was also co-director of the JMU Center for STEM Education and Outreach.

“We are left with a unique opportunity to transform science education through alignment of policies, funding and a near universal interest in providing educators with the highest quality tools to advance their learning experiences. students, ”said Dr. Eric Pyle, president of the NSTA. “It’s both exciting and humbling to take a leadership role and work with a strong team right now. ”

Pyle has also been an active member of the science education community for many years; he contributed to the Kindergarten to Grade 12 Science Education Framework as a member of the Earth and Space Science Design Team and was one of the primary reviewers of the Next generation scientific standards. He was a Division Director on the NSTA Board of Directors and a member of the NSTA Board and oversaw the development of the NSTA Position Statement on Climate Science Education and Training Standards for science teachers. He has also published extensively in NSTA journals and has made numerous presentations at national and regional NSTA conferences.

“This is a pivotal time for education, and in particular for science and STEM education, and we are fortunate that Eric will lead NSTA next year,” said Dr Erika Shugart, Executive Director of the NSTA. “He is a thoughtful leader with great ideas that will continue to advance the mission of the association.”

About NSTA

The National Science Teaching Association (NSTA) is a vibrant community of 40,000 science teachers and professionals committed to best practices in science education and its impact on student learning. The NSTA provides high quality science resources and lifelong learning so that science teachers can grow professionally and excel in their careers. For new and experienced teachers, the NSTA community provides the opportunity to network with like-minded peers nationwide, connect with leading mentors and researchers, and learn from the best in the field.



Source link

]]>
https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/01/virginia-professor-begins-term-as-2021-2022-president-of-the-national-science-teaching-association/feed/ 0
Faced with food insecurity at home, he worked tirelessly to advocate for the interests of others in similar positions – Massachusetts Daily Collegian https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/31/faced-with-food-insecurity-at-home-he-worked-tirelessly-to-advocate-for-the-interests-of-others-in-similar-positions-massachusetts-daily-collegian/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/31/faced-with-food-insecurity-at-home-he-worked-tirelessly-to-advocate-for-the-interests-of-others-in-similar-positions-massachusetts-daily-collegian/#respond Mon, 31 May 2021 20:56:18 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/31/faced-with-food-insecurity-at-home-he-worked-tirelessly-to-advocate-for-the-interests-of-others-in-similar-positions-massachusetts-daily-collegian/ “The whole semester was just that kind of prolonged challenge, never having enough time, struggling to have enough food to support myself, and isolated like everyone else… On the other hand, being able to get through the semester after doing the job I did, after crossing over to the other side, was a great triumph […]]]>


“The whole semester was just that kind of prolonged challenge, never having enough time, struggling to have enough food to support myself, and isolated like everyone else… On the other hand, being able to get through the semester after doing the job I did, after crossing over to the other side, was a great triumph ”

When the pandemic began, Chancellor Subbaswammy announced guidelines for which students could return to the University of Massachusetts campus. Some students who could not return found themselves in a difficult position. For one student, the public nature of the guidelines meant he was staying in an environment that was difficult for his mental health and where he faced food insecurity. Adam Lechowicz, a young computer and political science student, spent the fall semester at home, during which he described in a series of emails the various challenges he faced and his hard work to help d ‘other students in a similar situation.

The decision to stay home was partly made for him and partly calculated by him. Since he did not have classes on campus, he felt he had no “justification” to give his family without causing problems at home. He weighed in on other factors, but when the spring semester rolled around he signed up for classes on campus so he had that clear reason to come back.

“There were also two other factors; at first I negotiated with myself and thought the fall semester could be manageable at home, as the online half of the spring semester hadn’t been too bad in terms of load work and I had time to get out of the house – it didn’t. This is not the case. Of course, the university being as expensive as it is, saving money on room and board was also something I was considering, ”he explained.

In early October, like many of his peers, he found himself buried under assignments that seemed to keep piling up. Although he took the same number of credits the previous semester, he felt his workload increased significantly this semester as faculty added assignments that looked like “heavy work.” In other classes, a “flipped classroom” option, where lessons are records assigned as homework, and class time is spent on follow-up activities, “doubled the time commitment” for him.

“It’s hard, and I think it’s hard for everyone. As for me in particular, this has manifested itself in a unique situation where my to-do list is so overwhelmed that there are rightfully days when I have to dedicate enough time in a day to prepare and eat a meal – I think there are reasonable reviews that I should have dropped a class or two to give myself more time in the average day, but I’m stuck with this dilemma between getting a degree a little on time and taking less time. 20 credits, ”he explained.

“I also tried going out and buying some food from the grocery store which has improved my overall situation but also has the same downside as’ sometimes I just don’t have the time “.”

While juggling schoolwork, Lechowicz also immersed himself in campus advocacy and student government. He worked in one of the fall planning working groups with the UMass administration, where he always prioritized students who shared similar experiences with him. He continued this work in the spring semester, as a student member of the spring planning groups. In this position, he continued to emphasize the importance of bringing back students who rely on the physical campus for stability.

“I approached them from the perspective that the changes would help students in general, but especially students who have to deal with situational uncertainty in their day-to-day lives – I hope one of these successful advocacy efforts has been successful. makes a difference for someone, ”he said.

As SGA’s Technology Secretary, he helped orchestrate three “email campaigns” during the year for SGA. In these campaigns, students could send emails to the UMass administrator to support a policy change. The first was in support of a revised pass / fail policy which resulted in the extension of the pass / fail option until the spring semester. The second supported a change in student employment policy that would give compensation to student workers on and off campus during the spring semester lockdown. The latest campaign protested against the proposed tuition and tuition fee increases for room, board and out-of-state tuition fees, which were unsuccessful.

In October, while working on campaigns for other students, he started planning a spring semester that would be better than the fall one. Faced with difficulties accessing food and the social isolation that weighs on his mental health, he wanted the spring semester to be different.

“This week has been particularly difficult in terms of food, to be completely honest with you – I feel it affected my thinking for the coming semester. I tried to look for an internship that would basically allow me to take a sabbatical in the spring and get me out of my house. I have only received one response so far, but I remain optimistic. I’m still signing up for some classes just in case, and I wholeheartedly plan to apply for on-campus accommodation as needed this time around so that I can have a constant source of nourishment in my life, ”he said. he declared. “If my application is successful, I plan to tell my dad that I have a course on campus, or a similar deviation, to avoid scrutiny – it’s a little touchy subject. If my application is not accepted, I want to try to move for the spring. A lot of my friends live off campus in the Amherst area, and I might try to see if I can sublet, make the couch, or get one of my other friends into a joint lease. “

In February, when asked what he thought was most important for people to understand the impact of the pandemic, he pointed out that the effects are often closer than initially thought.

“I think the most important thing people need to understand about the pandemic is how the stresses of all of this can have unintended and sometimes surprising side effects on people who are closer than expected,” a- he declared. “In this society, where life is a delicate balance that can be upset with the slightest disturbance, something like the pandemic does this to a lot of people. Check your friends and make sure they are okay. “

Reflecting on his semester as a whole, he described it as an “extended challenge,” but noted that his ability to overcome it and do all the work he was doing was a major triumph.

“The whole semester was just that kind of prolonged challenge, never having enough time, struggling to have enough food to support myself, and isolated like everyone else. There have certainly been a few weeks here and there where the combination of workload / isolation really touched me and made everything really difficult. On the other hand, being able to get through the semester after doing the job that I did, being able to move on to the other side, was a great triumph.

During the spring semester, Lechowicz lived on campus and said his mental health “improved tremendously” almost immediately after arriving on campus.

“Despite everything that was going on at the start of the semester with COVID, the shift from campus to high risk and the isolation that brought about just being here and having that stability in terms of food and well- Being material really helped me cope with an otherwise isolated semester with a heavy workload, ”he said. “I think for me my experience from this last year at university really shows how material circumstances have a ripple effect on other aspects of well-being. This pandemic has exacerbated structural inequalities in our society. “

“I think UMass should take steps to better support those student populations who disproportionately suffer from instability – housing, food or situational insecurity – in their lives, especially BIPOC and LGBTQ + students.

Claire Healy can be reached at [email protected].



Source link

]]>
https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/31/faced-with-food-insecurity-at-home-he-worked-tirelessly-to-advocate-for-the-interests-of-others-in-similar-positions-massachusetts-daily-collegian/feed/ 0
2 of the county are the St. John’s Valedictorians | Community https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/30/2-of-the-county-are-the-st-johns-valedictorians-community/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/30/2-of-the-county-are-the-st-johns-valedictorians-community/#respond Sun, 30 May 2021 23:00:00 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/30/2-of-the-county-are-the-st-johns-valedictorians-community/ TOLEDO – St. John’s Jesuit High School Announced Promotion of Valedictorian and Salvationatorian Class of 2021 Jordan Schuman, Bowling Green; Anthony Pacewicz, Perrysburg; and Charles Mlcek, Monclova, will share the greatest honor while Joseph Hoppenjans, Sylvania, is the Salvationatorian. Schuman attended Bowling Green Middle School. He is a finalist for the National Merit Scholarship, earning […]]]>


TOLEDO – St. John’s Jesuit High School Announced Promotion of Valedictorian and Salvationatorian Class of 2021

Jordan Schuman, Bowling Green; Anthony Pacewicz, Perrysburg; and Charles Mlcek, Monclova, will share the greatest honor while Joseph Hoppenjans, Sylvania, is the Salvationatorian.

Schuman attended Bowling Green Middle School. He is a finalist for the National Merit Scholarship, earning a perfect ACT score of 36. He is a Fellow of the National Honors Society and the Magis Society. He is a member of the brass band, the interior drums and the marching band. He is part of the SJJ Ambassador Program and has served as a student representative for the Father’s Club. He has volunteered at Just Pancakes, Seagate Food Bank and Sunbridge Schools.

Schuman plans to attend Georgetown University and major in chemistry.

Pacewicz attended Perrysburg High School. He is a member of the National Honors Society, the Magis Society and the Spanish National Honors Society. He was a counselor at the Ohio Children’s Army Camp. While in St. John’s Jesuit, he volunteered with the Toledo Labre program and at Crossgates Elementary School as part of the SJJ Christian Service Program.

A member of the college football team, he will continue to play at the college level. He will attend Oberlin College and major in biology on a pre-medical track.

Charles Mlcek attended Anthony Wayne High School. He is a National Merit Fellow, Member of the National Honor Society, the Magis Society and the Spanish National Honor Society. He has been active in theater with prominent roles in spring musicals and fall plays. He is a member of Model United Nations, the Student Council, the Alliance for Social Justice and the Core Admissions Team. He has participated in Youth Leadership Toledo, as Big Brother Program Group Leader, Retreat Leader and Mentoring Group Leader. He participated in the chess team and as co-director of the school news channel TV-4. He served at the Mereda Center as part of the SJJ Christian Service Program.

Mlcek plans to attend the University of Washington and Lee and will study politics on a pre-legislative track.

Hoppenjans attended Christ the King Catholic School. He is a member of the National Honors Society. He received the Junior Outstanding Student Award and served as Junior Class President and Senior Student Council President. He participated as a retreat facilitator and Big Brother program leader. He played golf throughout his high school career and was named captain of the varsity team. A member of the SJJ Spirit Squad, he was a TV presenter at a TV-4 school. As part of the SJJ Christian Service Program, he served in schools in Sunbridge.

He plans to attend Ohio State University and major in corporate finance.



Source link

]]>
https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/30/2-of-the-county-are-the-st-johns-valedictorians-community/feed/ 0
Brief news from Rockingham County and surrounding areas | Rockingham now https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/30/brief-news-from-rockingham-county-and-surrounding-areas-rockingham-now/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/30/brief-news-from-rockingham-county-and-surrounding-areas-rockingham-now/#respond Sun, 30 May 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/30/brief-news-from-rockingham-county-and-surrounding-areas-rockingham-now/ Senior McMichael Scholarship Butler + Burke, a full-service accounting firm based in Winston-Salem, awarded the Dalton L. McMichael Excellence Fellowship to Denise Simmons of Stoneville. The annual scholarship of $ 1,000 is available to high school students at Dalton L. McMichael High School in Mayodan. While at McMichael High School, Simmons was a Fellow of […]]]>


Senior McMichael Scholarship

Butler + Burke, a full-service accounting firm based in Winston-Salem, awarded the Dalton L. McMichael Excellence Fellowship to Denise Simmons of Stoneville. The annual scholarship of $ 1,000 is available to high school students at Dalton L. McMichael High School in Mayodan.

While at McMichael High School, Simmons was a Fellow of the Phoenix STEM Academy and will graduate with STEM Honors. She was also a member of the National Honors Society, Student of Promise, Beta Club, Technology Student Association, was Secretary for Students Against Destructive Decisions, was a student ambassador, and volunteered at UNC Rockingham Hospital. This fall, Simmons will begin her college education at Elon University, where she plans to pursue a BSBA in Entrepreneurship.

Fire protection association receives state subsidy

State Insurance Commissioner and Fire Marshal Mike Causey announced that the Northwest Rockingham County Fire Protection Association has received a grant of $ 20,900 through the 2021 Carolina Volunteer Fire Department Fund North.

The check will be mailed to Fire Chief Mason James to be used by the department to purchase the necessary equipment.

Equipment is purchased using matching funds and must be approved by the Department of Insurance, Office of the State Fire Marshal.



Source link

]]>
https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/30/brief-news-from-rockingham-county-and-surrounding-areas-rockingham-now/feed/ 0
“It’s a bit surreal:” High school graduation sends the class of 2021 https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/29/its-a-bit-surreal-high-school-graduation-sends-the-class-of-2021/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/29/its-a-bit-surreal-high-school-graduation-sends-the-class-of-2021/#respond Sat, 29 May 2021 04:30:00 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/29/its-a-bit-surreal-high-school-graduation-sends-the-class-of-2021/ To celebrate his graduation from college high school, Ryan Beyer did a backflip as he left the stage Friday night at Tom Roche Field. Student speaker Emily Fosdick Early gave attendees an overview of charter high school through a “day-to-day” address on the college experience. College graduate Emily Fosdick Early reflects on the present during […]]]>


To celebrate his graduation from college high school, Ryan Beyer did a backflip as he left the stage Friday night at Tom Roche Field.

Student speaker Emily Fosdick Early gave attendees an overview of charter high school through a “day-to-day” address on the college experience.

College graduate Emily Fosdick Early reflects on the present during Class of 2021 on Friday May 28, 2021 at Tom Roche Field in Greeley on May 28, 2021 (Alex McIntyre / Photographer)

“We were able to attend classes from the comfort of our beds, which could have contributed to the seniority,” Fosdick Early told the crowd gathered for the 120th start of the school.

And class president Anna Bedell and high school principal Jeff Casey co-hosted a humorous look at the 114 college class members of the 2021 college with a glimpse into their antics and accomplishments.

These included Casey recalling an elderly person who suffered a dislocated knee during the choir, other class members who showed up to school wearing scrubs after attending an EMT class and a review serious skills of collective conduct of classes.

Photos: Launch ceremony of the 2021 promotion of the university high school at the Tom Roche field of the university high school

“Some of them are terrible,” Casey said. “Tickets in school zones.”

The nearly 90-minute ceremony ended with a slideshow of the senior class as the new graduates and professors left the stadium field.

Many graduates and their families gathered on a lawn outside the school where photos were taken. Across the parking lot, attached to a fence above the stadium, were bunches of balloons – in school colors blue, gray and white – with each graduate’s name and a quote.

Keegan Kingsley called the evening “perfect” and the ceremony “fun”. Not that long ago, Kingsley, who headed to the U.S. Air Force in late summer, thought an in-person graduation might not happen with COVID-19.

“I’m a little surprised,” Kingsley said. “Happy.”

A student carries her mortar tray adorned with the words “LOL Bye” during the launching ceremony for the 2021 class of varsity high school in the Tom Roche field at Greeley College high school on May 28, 2021. (Alex McIntyre / photographer)

Renee Greenberg was one of the many elderly people at the university to decorate the top of her mortar. Atop Greenberg’s Mortar was an image of a small pop and punk rock band called Waterparks.

Greenberg, 17, has listened to and followed the Houston three-man group since her first year and they have come to mean a lot to her. Around her neck, she wore a Waterparks plectrum on a chain. She picked up the opening pick at a concert in Denver a few years ago.

“They’ve been with me for so long and I hope that as they evolve their music will evolve with me,” said Greenberg. “They grew up growing up.”

College high school graduate students walk to the stage to receive their diplomas during the School of 2021 class on Friday, May 28, 2021 on Tom Roche Field at Greeley College High School. (Alex McIntyre / photographer)

Greenberg, a member of the University’s National Honor Society and Music Honor Society, plans to continue his evolution with additional education. She went to Aims Community College, then to the University of Northern Colorado. She said she had an interest in studying psychology or physiotherapy, but entered college with an open mind before committing to a major.

Within an hour of the ceremony, Greenberg was still trying to figure out the end of high school and graduation.

“It’s a bit surreal,” she says. “It hasn’t hit me yet. I didn’t think this would happen.



Source link

]]>
https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/29/its-a-bit-surreal-high-school-graduation-sends-the-class-of-2021/feed/ 0
Richmond names top 10 graduates for 2021 | Life https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/28/richmond-names-top-10-graduates-for-2021-life/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/28/richmond-names-top-10-graduates-for-2021-life/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 19:00:00 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/28/richmond-names-top-10-graduates-for-2021-life/ At a recent Richmond Community Schools School Board meeting, officials recognized and congratulated the top 10 graduates of the Richmond High School class of 2021. Held in Zoom format due to the pandemic, the meeting brought together board members, administrators and honored students. and their parents all appearing on camera. Renee Ara, Executive Director of […]]]>


At a recent Richmond Community Schools School Board meeting, officials recognized and congratulated the top 10 graduates of the Richmond High School class of 2021. Held in Zoom format due to the pandemic, the meeting brought together board members, administrators and honored students. and their parents all appearing on camera.

Renee Ara, Executive Director of Curriculum and Educational Services, presented the slideshow featuring the top 10 graduates of 2021. She highlighted the additional challenges older people have endured during the global pandemic, but said this had just proven that the known obstacle was too difficult for these students to overcome.

She then introduced Richmond High School Principal Andrew Kastl, who in turn shared each student’s accomplishments. He said the top 10 students demonstrated consistent academic excellence and furthermore he could speak about their character, work ethic and selflessness.

The group included both members and leaders of the National Honor Society, undergraduates, student-athletes, and students involved in a range of extracurricular activities.

Many are also recognized as top students at the Blue Water and Macomb Area conferences, Kastl said.

After the principal shared information about each student, the Zoom meeting camera brought each graduate and their parents into focus so that a top 10 medal was placed around their necks.

Richmond High School’s 110 graduates of 2021 participated in an official graduation ceremony on May 26 at Jimmy John’s Field in Utica.

Here’s a look at the top 10 graduates of this year.

Jasmin alfaro

Parents: Heriberto and Rosa Alfaro

GPA: 3.986 – Member of the National Honor Society

Post-secondary education plans: Oakland University will study engineering.

The greatest academic achievement: to be part of the top 10.

Jaelyn Amhdar

Parents: Heidi and George Amhdar

GPA: 4.014 – Member of the National Honor Society

Post-Secondary Plans: Goshen College will play volleyball and study exercise science.

The greatest academic achievement: staying in the top 10 throughout the four years of high school.

Nicholas fistler

Parents: Darrin Fistler and Susan Porter

GPA: 4,027

Post-Secondary Education Plans: Attend Northwood University to major in accounting.

Best academic achievement: CTE student of the year.

Samantha gall

Parents: Susan and Andrew Gall

GPA: 4,099 – Member of the National Honor Society

Post-Secondary Education Plans: Attend Central Michigan University to major in meteorology.

Greatest academic achievement: Pass the AP calculation with a good mark.

Sarah gasko

Parents: Sherry and Thomas Gasko

GPA: 4.108 – President of the National Honor Society

Post-Secondary Education Plans: Complete Early College of Macomb, then transfer to Michigan State University to study Environmental Engineering.

Greatest academic achievement: finish n ° 1 in his class.

Emmelia Rhein

Parents: John and Linda Rhein

GPA: 4.047 – Member of the National Honor Society

Post-Secondary Education Plans – Plans to attend Macomb Community College and then transfer to a local university – undecided on majoring in college.

Best academic success: be in the top 10 and win just like in high school.

Melissa Rochon

Parents: John and Dawn Rochon

GPA: 4,096 – Member of the National Honor Society

Post-Secondary Education Plans: Complete the Early College of Macomb program to earn an Associate of Arts degree and transfer to Michigan Tech for Electrical or Mechanical Engineering.

Greatest Academic Achievement: Honor for all four years of high school and on the Dean’s List at Macomb Community College for 2020.

Kaitlyn sears

Parents: Kathy and Gary Sears

GPA: 4,073 – Treasurer of the National Honor Society

Post-secondary plans: Complete the Early College of Macomb program and transfer to a university to study psychology.

Greatest Academic Achievement: Be accepted into the Early College of Macomb program.

Skylar swartz

Parents: James and Heather Swartz

GPA: 4.102 – Vice President of the National Honor Society

Post-Secondary Education Plans: Plans to attend Macomb Community College to earn her associate’s degree, then transfer to a university to earn her bachelor’s degree. I then plan to pursue medical studies.

Greatest Academic Achievement: Setting high academic standards for myself and then achieving them.

Alyssa Systermann

Parents: Saundra Richards and Nick Systermann

GPA: 4.024 – Member of the National Honor Society

Post-Secondary Plans: Complete the Early College of Macomb program, then transfer to Wayne State University to study psychology and social work.

Best academic achievement: Obtain an associate’s degree while still in high school.

Barb Pert Templeton is a freelance journalist. She can be contacted at barbperttempleton.reporter@yahoo.com.



Source link

]]>
https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/28/richmond-names-top-10-graduates-for-2021-life/feed/ 0