Student Society – USC PRSSA Government & Student Funding http://uscprssa.com/ Government & Student Funding Wed, 22 Jun 2022 19:10:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://uscprssa.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Student Society – USC PRSSA Government & Student Funding http://uscprssa.com/ 32 32 Vinh-Nhan Ngo: Physics Researcher and Certified Pilot – UMaine News https://uscprssa.com/2022/06/22/vinh-nhan-ngo-physics-researcher-and-certified-pilot-umaine-news/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 18:55:56 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2022/06/22/vinh-nhan-ngo-physics-researcher-and-certified-pilot-umaine-news/ Getting a pilot certification and flying an airplane might not be the first thing that comes to mind when you think of college experiences. But for Vinh-Nhan Ngo, of Bangor, Maine, that has always been his goal. As a freshman, Nhan became a member of the UMaine Flying Club and as a sophomore, earned his […]]]>

Getting a pilot certification and flying an airplane might not be the first thing that comes to mind when you think of college experiences. But for Vinh-Nhan Ngo, of Bangor, Maine, that has always been his goal. As a freshman, Nhan became a member of the UMaine Flying Club and as a sophomore, earned his pilot certification and was elected president of the student organization. Nhan says being able to fulfill his dream of flying has given him the opportunity to see a new perspective of the world and to share the experience with his friends and family.

Nhan hopes to become a certified flight instructor.

“I’ve always enjoyed teaching people the basics of flight when I was learning them and I think it would be fun to take on some real students,” he says. Nhan hopes to earn his instrument rating next year, which will allow him to fly in more adverse weather conditions and become a safer pilot.

Nhan will graduate from UMaine a year early with a major in physics and three minors, political science, astronomy and mathematics. As a result of his academic achievement, he received the UMaine Presidential Award, was recognized as a James S. Stevens Outstanding Junior, and is inducted into Sigma Pi Sigma, the Honor Society for Physics. After graduating, Nhan would like to attend a graduate school.

In addition to the Flying Club, Nhan is also involved on campus as Treasurer of the Society of Physics Students and a member of Mainely Voices.

Nhan is currently working with Sam Hess’ lab group in research on biophysics and super resolution microscopy. Their team is working on influenza and COVID-19 to study how they behave and infect cells. Nhan says Hess has enhanced his UMaine experience and describes him as a teacher who is “always very accommodating and teaches very intuitively.”

Nhan describes the main project that Hess’s group is working on as “the study of hemagglutinin (HA) clusters of the viral influenza protein. It’s known to colocalize with a lipid called PIP2, so we can see both, and we can study the clustering mechanism. By finding drugs that disrupt clustering, viral replication can be slowed, and these methods have impacts on other viruses such as COVID. With his focus on the physical side of this project, he says he will “primarily try to find identifying patterns in fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy images, such as programs to identify the size and position of cluster”.

One program that helped Nhan succeed at UMaine was Maine’s Learning Assistant program, which he says “helped my bottom line when I work as a deputy, and also having peers your age who are happy to teach is a great way to learn. »

Contact: Hope Carroll, hope.carroll@maine.edu

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Student News: June 22, 2022 | https://uscprssa.com/2022/06/20/student-news-june-22-2022/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 22:51:24 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2022/06/20/student-news-june-22-2022/ UNIVERSITY OF SCRANTON John P.Lambert of Cooperstown was among 1,700 students named to the spring semester deans list at the University of Scranton in Scranton, Pennsylvania. Pupils of the month for June at Milford Central School are in eighth grade Toby Cotten and ninth grader Scott Genardo. The Fenimore Art Museum regional youth art competition […]]]>

UNIVERSITY OF SCRANTON

John P.Lambert of Cooperstown was among 1,700 students named to the spring semester deans list at the University of Scranton in Scranton, Pennsylvania.

Pupils of the month for June at Milford Central School are in eighth grade Toby Cotten and ninth grader Scott Genardo.

The Fenimore Art Museum regional youth art competition prizes were awarded recently. The grand prize was awarded to a 12th grade student Monique Kennedy of Hartwick, a homeschooler, for her drawing “Reach for Yore Memories”.

A total of 32 winning artworks were selected from 320 submissions for the Young at Art! Inspired by memory, on view at the Fenimore Art Museum until July 4. The works can also be viewed online at fenimoreartmuseum.org/youngatart2022.

Young at Art is sponsored in part by Bank of Cooperstown, New York Central Mutual Insurance, the Black Family Foundation; and Stewart’s Holiday Game.

BALDWIN WALLACE UNIVERSITY

Jaelyn Jaquay of Cherry Valley was inducted into Psi Chi, the International Honor Society in Psychology, at Baldwin Wallace University during the spring semester.

Jaquay, a graduate of Cherry Valley-Springfield Central School majoring in communication sciences and disorders and psychology, shared the honor with 11 other students.

Membership in the society is extended to psychology majors and minors with second-semester second-semester status who have completed at least nine hours of psychology coursework per semester, have a minimum overall average of 3.4, and a grade point average Minimum cumulative score of 3.0 in psychology courses.

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Representatives of university students are concerned about a possible increase in tuition fees https://uscprssa.com/2022/06/18/representatives-of-university-students-are-concerned-about-a-possible-increase-in-tuition-fees/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 14:03:26 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2022/06/18/representatives-of-university-students-are-concerned-about-a-possible-increase-in-tuition-fees/ Student leaders at Iowa State Universities have said proposed tuition increases and the erosion of state support will not only hurt students, but also Iowa communities in the future. . The Iowa board of directors will consider a proposal on Monday to increase in-state graduate and undergraduate tuition by 4.25%. The meeting will only be […]]]>

Student leaders at Iowa State Universities have said proposed tuition increases and the erosion of state support will not only hurt students, but also Iowa communities in the future. .

The Iowa board of directors will consider a proposal on Monday to increase in-state graduate and undergraduate tuition by 4.25%. The meeting will only be the first reading and the final vote will not take place until the July meeting.

Undergraduate students at all three universities would see a tuition increase of over $300 per semester. The proposal comes after lawmakers approved a just 1.1% increase in general state aid for the upcoming school year. The universities asked for a $15 million increase and received $5.5 million.

Iowa State University student body president Jacob Ludwig said in an interview that Iowa Regents universities have long benefited from being lower cost compared to universities in neighboring states. Every year that state support wanes, Iowa’s advantage fades.

“We’re really going to have to be cognizant of that reality and it’s something we’re going to have to present to lawmakers for years to come,” Ludwig said. “We’re going to have to do a better job of communicating not only that it’s important to fund public education, which is usually a public good, but also the value that we bring to Iowa, what is the investment that the state legislature does.”

University of Northern Iowa student body president Leila Mašinović said rising costs will keep some students from attending universities.

“At this point, we are not only affecting our students and their families and you know how they can afford college education, but we are also affecting the quality of our communities going forward,” Mašinović said. “I mean, if you raise the price so high, people are going to stop going to college because they wouldn’t, they wouldn’t be able to afford it.”

The University of Iowa will offer a 1.17% increase for out-of-state undergraduate tuition and a 1.51% increase for out-of-state graduate students. These rates differ by market in the hope of attracting non-residents.

University of Iowa Student Body President Patrick Johnson said in an email response, “The University of Iowa Undergraduate Student Government supports and advocates for access to affordable and quality education for all. While appropriations decisions are ultimately determined by our leaders in the State Legislature, we remain committed to working with elected officials as well as Iowa Regents to ensure an education that meets the standards of universities in Iowa at an affordable cost for years to come. ”

Tuition fees are also increasing

When it comes to tuition, Iowa State students could face a $145 hike, while University of Iowa students will pay an additional $56 and Iowa State students University of Northern Iowa will pay an additional $27. All three universities have a tuition committee that meets with various departments to discuss financial needs and then produces funding recommendations for the board of trustees.

Ludwig also served on the Iowa State Tuition Committee. He said the fee increase was aimed at keeping services at current levels due to rising costs.

“If we’re going to increase fees, it’s only to keep the level up, because I don’t think students are asking for a lot of new services right now,” Ludwig said. “But obviously it really hurts when you lose big things, especially for advisers like health services. It’s not really an area where we can afford to cut funding.

The three universities have raised tuition to better equip mental health services on campus after years of high demand despite declining enrollment. Mašinović said students’ needs for mental health services have increased after the pandemic and she hopes the increase can meet the demand.

Graduates are still asking for a raise

A union of graduate student workers still plans to demand a pay rise for its members, Caleb Klipowicz said. He is the publicity chair of the Campaign to Organize Graduate Students (COGS) union at the University of Iowa. Klipowicz said that while the regents could afford raises for administration, which were approved last month, COGS still plans to seek a salary increase for graduate students that matches inflation rates.

“If they’re not asking enough or doing enough on their end when it comes to the Board of Regents, that’s not our concern because honestly we’re here for the workers and we’re negotiating with the Board of Regents, not with the Legislative Assembly,” Klipowicz said. . “So we will continue to push for salaries that will work for us and it’s up to them to make it work for them at the other end. If it’s too hard for them, we can always stop.

Undergraduate student contracts, teaching assistants and resident advisers don’t have to pay tuition, but Klipowicz said not all graduate students are able to fill these roles every semester. .

“We already know that inflation is rising and the cost of living in Iowa City for an apartment is already taking more than half of our salary away from us,” Klipowicz said. “So it’s just going to add more and more financial burden that people are probably going to translate into additional student debt that they wouldn’t have had before.”

Students and others will have the opportunity to address the proposed increases at Monday’s board meeting, which will be held online.

Mašinović said the tuition increase will have greater implications for society as a whole, because greater educational opportunity means stronger communities within the state of Iowa.

“It’s so important that everyone comes out and votes because the people who decide these things are not the Board of Regents, they are the legislators,” Mašinović said. “So in order to have an understanding and a better support system for our students and everyone involved in the process, we need to make sure that we vote in people who we think will have a good impact… We need people we trust. in our legislative positions.

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NC school skirt policy for girls overturned in court https://uscprssa.com/2022/06/15/nc-school-skirt-policy-for-girls-overturned-in-court/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 14:54:00 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2022/06/15/nc-school-skirt-policy-for-girls-overturned-in-court/ Placeholder while loading article actions In a charter school in North Carolina, all students follow the same curriculum. But their gender-specific uniform requirements — pants for boys and skirts, skorts, or sweaters for girls — separate them in a way a federal court ruled Tuesday was unconstitutional. The dress code at Charter Day School in […]]]>
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In a charter school in North Carolina, all students follow the same curriculum. But their gender-specific uniform requirements — pants for boys and skirts, skorts, or sweaters for girls — separate them in a way a federal court ruled Tuesday was unconstitutional.

The dress code at Charter Day School in Leland, North Carolina, can no longer be enforced, senior circuit judge Barbara Milano Keenan wrote in a majority opinion. The school founder’s assertion that uniform rules promote chivalry “based on the idea that girls are ‘fragile vessels’ deserving ‘gentle’ treatment by boys” was found to be discriminatory at the school. against female students in the United States’ 10-to-6 decision. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals.

“By implementing the requirement for skirts based on blatant gender stereotypes of the ‘proper place’ for girls and women in society, [the school] acted in flagrant violation of the Equal Protection Clause,” Keenan wrote in the notice.

The decision follows a seven-year effort to end the school’s skirt requirement for female students.

In 2015 Keely Burks, then a 14-year-old eighth grader at Charter Day School, started a petition with her friends to change the uniform policy. They eventually collected over 100 signatures, she wrote in 2016, but the document “was taken from us by a teacher and we never got it back.”

Around the same time, the mother of a kindergarten child inquired about this requirement, which she considered discriminatory. The school’s founder, Baker A. Mitchell, replied to her email, explaining that the Charter Day School was “committed to preserving chivalry and respect between young women and men” and that there was a need to “restore, then preserve, traditional respect for peers,” according to court documents.

Burks, the kindergartener and a fourth grader later became plaintiffs in a 2016 lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union. They alleged in the lawsuit that being forced to wear skirts prevented them from playing freely, moving actively and feeling as if their comfort was valued as much as that of male students.

“I hope that by challenging my school’s policy, I can help other girls who want to go to school without being stereotyped or who just want to play outside or sit in class without feeling bad about themselves. comfortable,” Burks wrote at the time.

A lengthy court battle ensued, in which decisions regarding the case were swapped between federal and state courts. consider whether the dress code violated the rights of female students.

“No, it’s not 1821 or 1921. It’s 2021,” Keenan, the judge, wrote last summer. “Women serve in the combat units of our armed forces. Women walk in space and bring their talents to the International Space Station. Women sit on our nation’s Supreme Court, in Congress, and today a woman is Vice President of the United States.

To determine the constitutionality of the skirt requirement, the judges considered whether the charter school was a public entity. Charter Day School argued that it was a private entity and that the Constitution’s Equal Protection Clause – which prohibits discrimination – did not apply.

But a majority of the federal appeals court ultimately disagreed. Because the charter school receives state funding, the judges wrote, it must follow the same laws and civil rights protections as public schools, which are prohibited from imposing discriminatory dress codes. or censoring student expression.

Aaron Streett, an attorney representing Charter Day School, told the Washington Post that the school was evaluating next steps, adding that the court’s advice “limits parents’ ability to choose the best education for their children.”

For the plaintiffs in the lawsuit, the decision was celebrated – even after some are graduates of the K-8 institution.

“I am happy that the girls at Charter Day School can now learn, move and play on an equal footing with the boys at school,” said Bonnie Peltier, the mother of a former pupil involved in the case. . Release. “In 2022, girls shouldn’t have to choose between wearing something that makes them feel uncomfortable or missing instruction time in class.”

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Don’t Just Forgive Student Debt: The Cycle Ends Only With Free College https://uscprssa.com/2022/06/13/dont-just-forgive-student-debt-the-cycle-ends-only-with-free-college/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 22:30:00 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2022/06/13/dont-just-forgive-student-debt-the-cycle-ends-only-with-free-college/ Lost in the debate over President Biden’s early announcement that he plans to cancel student debt is a more complicated and arguably more important reality: Democrats have abandoned all efforts to make college tuition free at the federal. This means that even if Biden cancels all outstanding student debt, the federal government has not adopted […]]]>

Lost in the debate over President Biden’s early announcement that he plans to cancel student debt is a more complicated and arguably more important reality: Democrats have abandoned all efforts to make college tuition free at the federal.

This means that even if Biden cancels all outstanding student debt, the federal government has not adopted plans to prevent students from accumulating new debt in the future. While borrowers may momentarily rejoice in debt forgiveness, filing plans to make tuition free, Democrats are threatening to undermine their own attempts to expand college access and affordability. Debt cancellation – while potentially significant for millions of Americans – will not make higher education affordable without further action. The Biden administration, congressional Democrats, and yes, Republicans too, should do more to make college affordable so that millions of Americans can access the life-enhancing benefits of a college education.

Despite widely differing opinions regarding the appropriate role of higher education in American life, one indisputable fact remains: college degrees pay. Recent research suggests that the economic returns to college degrees are at an all-time high. On average, recent college graduates earn $52,000 a year, while young workers with a high school diploma but no graduate degree earn only $30,000 a year. This difference, known as the college salary premium, has increased since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Completing a college education is also associated with lower unemployment rates. Thus, when it comes to a worthwhile investment in an individual and a society, college proves its worth as an effective pathway to higher paying jobs and economic well-being.

But higher education plays a bigger role than just increasing students’ economic security. The US economy – for better or for worse – requires increasing the number of people with post-secondary credentials. Nearly two-thirds of all jobs require some form of college education, yet only 48% of Americans over the age of 25 have a college degree. And college completion rates vary widely by race, gender, and income: Black Americans, Native Americans, and Latinos are significantly less likely than white Americans to have a college degree. College graduation rates are lowest for black men and Native American men. Students from low-income families are significantly less likely than wealthy students to earn a bachelor’s degree. These inequalities, coupled with the disturbing reality that more than one million students have dropped out of school since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, make our long-term economic prospects even bleaker.

Despite its proven importance to students and the broader US economy, college is prohibitively expensive for millions of people. And tuition is only part of the problem. Although tuition costs have increased significantly over the past 10 years, the vast majority of the total cost of a college education is made up of student living expenses such as housing, food, transportation, and childcare. In fact, these costs beyond tuition – which include basic student needs – add up to more than $30,000 per year, more than three times the average cost of tuition at a public university. . Since the average in-state tuition at a four-year public university is $9,400 and the average two-year public college tuition is $3,900, tuition is only a small part of what makes college unaffordable for so many across the country.

To make college affordable for all Americans, federal policymakers must reduce the total cost of college. This should include free tuition at public colleges and universities. This will help students pay the full cost of college and allow them to use other sources of financial aid to help with living expenses. But even making tuition free will not prevent students from accumulating debt in the future. To avoid future student debt burdens, the Biden administration and Congress must craft federal policy that will reduce the living expenses that students find it hardest to afford: housing, food, transportation and childcare. To do this effectively, federal policymakers should:

  1. Increase financial aid to ensure all students can afford living expenses
  2. Provide housing vouchers to low-income students, especially those in community colleges
  3. Expand public interest programs – like SNAP – to better include and meet student needs
  4. Invest in public transit to ensure students have accessible transit options
  5. Invest in child care centers on or near university campuses and create subsidies to make access to these centers affordable for students

Democrats have a rare opportunity to introduce legislation that would actually prevent students from racking up debt in the future. If they do, they will be able to significantly advance equity in education and the economy. If they don’t, Americans can expect the cycle of heavy financial burdens to continue to devastate students indefinitely, even long after the one-time cancellation of student debt.

Chris Geary is a senior policy analyst at New America’s Center on Education and Labor, where he focuses on the intersection of higher education and labor policy and seeks to advance educational and economic equity. Previously, Chris was a policy analyst at the Georgetown Center on Poverty and Inequality, a policy officer in the New Orleans mayor’s office, and a public school teacher. Follow him on Twitter: @chrisggeary

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West Stanly High School has 155 early graduates – The Stanly News & Press https://uscprssa.com/2022/06/11/west-stanly-high-school-has-155-early-graduates-the-stanly-news-press/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 21:10:35 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2022/06/11/west-stanly-high-school-has-155-early-graduates-the-stanly-news-press/ In front of a stadium full of friends, family and loved ones, 155 West Stanly seniors walked on stage and received their diplomas as part of the early 2022 drills. West Stanly principal Anne McLendon presided over the ceremony and helped present the diplomas along with assistant principals Linsdey Merritt and Marty Ingram, as well […]]]>

In front of a stadium full of friends, family and loved ones, 155 West Stanly seniors walked on stage and received their diplomas as part of the early 2022 drills.

West Stanly principal Anne McLendon presided over the ceremony and helped present the diplomas along with assistant principals Linsdey Merritt and Marty Ingram, as well as West Stanly teacher Thomas LaBianca. Board of Education members Glenda Gibson and Carla Poplin, along with Deputy Superintendent of Human Resources Dr. Kecia Coln, represented Stanly County Schools.

First student honors speaker Eden Campos reflected on the growth of herself and her classmates over four years of high school, congratulating the graduates “for reaching this goal and overcoming all obstacles”.

Campos mentioned the year of the pandemic, saying teacher Wes Herlocker told him students would not be back after their extended spring break.

“I laughed at him, called him too dramatic. But of course two weeks passed and we didn’t go back to school,” Campos said.

Speaking to Herlocker, she said: ‘I’m not saying much, but I guess you were right. And for the first time in my life, I was wrong.

Regarding time away from school, she said: “Not only did we have to adjust to our new reality, but we were just teenagers starting to understand each other. I know that for me, discovering myself was something I did on my own and through the experiences of my friends. Their successes were mine, as were their heartbreaks and depressions.

Campos thanked her mother, who she said came to America when she was 18.

“I hope you see me and are proud of me, like I’m proud of you,” she said.

After speaking to her mother in Spanish, she continued, “To my Latino community, just know that things may be tough for us, but I know we have the power and the potential to change the world. Our successes will pave the way for future generations.

To her classmates, she said, “Thank you for showing me all the different ways to define success.”

McLendon asked graduates to advocate for those entering the workforce, going to college and those entering military service for recognition. She also mentioned that the West Stanly Class of 2022 won $6 million in scholarship funds.

Stella Griffin, president of the school’s National Honor Society, was the next student to speak, earning a round of laughter from the crowd when she said she had been voted “worst driver” as her senior superlative.

Griffin shared the story of a senior colleague who struggled to get financial aid for college, saying she came to her frustrated when the paperwork was missing, after having redone it “six or seven times “.

She said she was with the student when she found out she had received $21,000 from UNC-Chapel Hill.

“She knew she got it, and I know a lot of us got it too. Whether you struggled to get the credits to graduate, to find the motivation to pass the exam , I want to congratulate each of you for figuring it out,” Griffin said.

“As we move forward, I encourage you to do the same. If there’s something you can’t find a solution to, please continue.

Griffin also said, “We have to muster the courage…to do the right thing no matter what the circumstances.”

Special music was performed by senior Sophie Tucker as she strummed the guitar and sang “Rivers and Roads” from The Head and the Heart.

The farewell speech was delivered by Vanessa Perez.

“I hope the best years of your life are yet to come…whether you’re going to college, entering the workforce, or entering the military, I hope those years at West Stanly have helped you prepare for your future.”

The students were pronounced graduates by McLendon and moved their tassels on their mortarboard hats from right to left. Hats flew through the air during the graduation celebration.

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Many High School Rodeo Athletes Top Their Class | New https://uscprssa.com/2022/06/10/many-high-school-rodeo-athletes-top-their-class-new/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2022/06/10/many-high-school-rodeo-athletes-top-their-class-new/ Several Nebraska high school rodeo athletes have given some really big speeches over the past few weeks. Six high school seniors spoke in front of their classmates, family and friends as they finished their high school careers as valedictorians or salutatorians. Mekenna Fisher, Tucker Gillespie, Abby Lawton, Emma Ohm, Jett Sjeklocha and Shayda Vaughn finished […]]]>

Several Nebraska high school rodeo athletes have given some really big speeches over the past few weeks.

Six high school seniors spoke in front of their classmates, family and friends as they finished their high school careers as valedictorians or salutatorians.

Mekenna Fisher, Tucker Gillespie, Abby Lawton, Emma Ohm, Jett Sjeklocha and Shayda Vaughn finished top of their classes.

Fisher, a graduate of Sutherland High School, was valedictorian. Competing in barrel racing, pole bending, roping breakaway, tying and goat cutting, she qualified for the Nebraska State High School Finals Rodeo during of the past three years and the National High School Finals Rodeo.

In high school, she participated in FFA, FBLA, FCA, speech, drama, quiz bowl, student council, band and choir and was a member of the National Honor Society.

Fisher participated in the Rural Law Opportunity Program (RLOP) and will receive tuition and boarding at Chadron State College this fall and guaranteed admission to the University of Nebraska School of Law.

She is the daughter of Levi and Keri Fisher.

Gillespie, a graduate of McCook High School, is one of six seniors with a 4.0 GPA. (McCook High recognizes top GPAs and does not award valedictorian or salutatorian titles.) In high school, he was involved in FFA, Speech, Mock Trial, Thespian, and Interact, a Rotary junior program, and Youth Change Reaction, a group that focuses on community improvement projects. He also ran cross-country.

A queen cow horse competitor, Gillespie will attend Texas A&M and double major in animal science and neuroscience. He has qualified for the Nebraska State High School Finals for the past two years as well as the National High School Finals.

He is the son of Joe and Julie Gillespie.

Overton High School’s 2022 salutatorian is Abby Lawton. A pole bender, barrel runner and goat tyer, Lawton finished the year with a 4.0 GPA. She has participated in the FFA, FCCLA, Leadership Academy, National Honor Society, and Student Council.

This fall, Lawton will attend the University of South Dakota at Vermillion to major in medical biology. She hopes to attend medical school and become a neurosurgeon. The cowgirl has qualified for the state high school finals three times and the national championships twice.

She is the daughter of John and Lorna Lawton.

Emma Ohm, Arthur, Neb., a breakaway roper, goat rider, and team roper, is Arthur County High School’s valedictorian in 2022, with a 4.05 GPA.

The cowgirl competed in basketball and volleyball and was a member of her school’s FFA chapter, student council, band, National Honor Society, and president of the Neb. State High School Rodeo Association.

This fall, she will attend Black Hills State University in Spearfish, South Dakota, on a rodeo scholarship. She will study psychology because of her interest in the mental side of sports competition, especially rodeo.

She competed in state high school rodeo finals for three years and nationals for three years.

She is the daughter of Jason and Kaycee Ohm.

Jett Sjeklocha is the 2022 Saluter for Hayes Center High School.

A bull rider, steer wrestler and team stringer, in high school he played football and golf and was a member of the FFA, student council and the National Honor Society.

This fall, he will attend Mid-Plains Community College in North Platte on a rodeo scholarship. He will move towards a welding diploma. He qualified for three state high school finals rodeos and the national high school finals rodeo in 2021.

He is the son of Rusty Sjeklocha and Susan Sjeklocha.

Shayda Vaughn finished her high school career as a salutatorian for Hershey High School with a 4.0 GPA.

A competitor in the breakaway roping and team roping, she played volleyball and basketball in high school and was on the FBLA, TeamMates, student council, 4-H, and the National Honor Society.

She has competed in the state high school finals for the past three years.

This fall, Vaughn will attend the University of Nebraska-Kearney and could work toward an elementary education degree.

She is the daughter of Tim and Celie Vaughn.

Just like in other high school sports, rodeo athletes must maintain their grades to be eligible for rodeo. They often receive rodeo scholarships that help pay for tuition.

The Nebraska High School Finals Rodeo will wrap up the state season Friday through Sunday at the Adams County Fairgrounds in Hastings, 947 S. Baltimore Ave. Rodeo performances start at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, with the short ride on Sunday at 1 p.m.

The cuthorse competitions are at 7 a.m. Friday and Saturday with the finals at 8 a.m. Sunday. Cow Reined Horse takes place at 10 am Friday and Saturday.

The top four state finishers from each event advance to the National High School Finals Rodeo, to be held in Gillette, Wyoming, July 17-23.

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Fellowship Opportunity: Making Sense of Society’s Flaws https://uscprssa.com/2022/06/06/fellowship-opportunity-making-sense-of-societys-flaws/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 06:13:29 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2022/06/06/fellowship-opportunity-making-sense-of-societys-flaws/ Applications are now open for the first Swinburne Beyond the Fault Lines Liffman Fellowship. This is an opportunity for a leading journalist to engage with Swinburne undergraduates to explore and discuss the fault lines – the polarizing challenges we face as a society – and analyze the many perspectives that confront them. accompany. Established by […]]]>

Applications are now open for the first Swinburne Beyond the Fault Lines Liffman Fellowship. This is an opportunity for a leading journalist to engage with Swinburne undergraduates to explore and discuss the fault lines – the polarizing challenges we face as a society – and analyze the many perspectives that confront them. accompany.

Established by Swinburne Adjunct Professor Dr Michael Liffman AM, the program will encourage and exemplify respectful debate, open-mindedness and critical thinking, within the university and in the wider community. Participants will share this through journalistic writing, thought leadership and opinion pieces.

“With the world in a state of flux, it is becoming increasingly difficult to find common ground to address the great challenges we face as a society,” Dr Liffman said.

“It is the role of a university to make sense of these challenges and to have a revered journalist facilitating this understanding and coaching students on how to communicate these topics in the most respectful and articulate way to all audiences, will be powerful for our next generation of graduates.”

The selected scholar will receive a $10,000 award and provide mentorship, student masterclasses, a public lecture, and the launch of a student media project specializing in the major contemporary social issues and debates of our time.

The fellowship will be a flexible program over a 12-week period in Melbourne, Victoria, to support a current journalist who will be based in Swinburne’s Media and Communications Department.

To apply for this scholarship, the candidate must have:

  • Demonstrated experience of more than 5 years in journalism
  • Passion for creative thinking and educating our next generation graduates
  • Evidence of achievement through published or broadcast plays
  • Australian citizenship or permanent residency

Applications will be assessed against:

  • A brief justification of how the journalistic practice has sparked deeper questioning of a complex social, cultural or modern issue, ideally bringing people or communities together to create positive change
  • A proposal of 200 words (approximately) for a thematic framed multimedia project
  • current resume

Closing of applications on June 30, 2022.

Contact:

For more information on the scholarship or to apply, please contact Professor Therese Davis, Head of Department of Media and Communication, School of Social Sciences, Media, Film and Education. theresedavis@swin.edu.au

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Go Dutch? Why the British Monarchy will need to modernize https://uscprssa.com/2022/06/03/go-dutch-why-the-british-monarchy-will-need-to-modernize/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 14:00:24 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2022/06/03/go-dutch-why-the-british-monarchy-will-need-to-modernize/ King Willem-Alexander and Queen Máxima of the Netherlands cycling during a visit to Friesland in 2020 ©Getty Images In the eternal scene of Monty Python and the Holy Grail, King Arthur pretends to drive through the British countryside. (He is not actually on horseback.) Seeing a peasant, he shouts “Old woman!” “Man!” corrects the peasant, […]]]>
King Willem-Alexander and Queen Máxima of the Netherlands cycling during a visit to Friesland in 2020 ©Getty Images

In the eternal scene of Monty Python and the Holy Grail, King Arthur pretends to drive through the British countryside. (He is not actually on horseback.) Seeing a peasant, he shouts “Old woman!” “Man!” corrects the peasant, and an argument ensues. When a real peasant girl (played by male Python Terry Jones) crawls through the mud, she’s even more combative: “Who does he think he is? Hey?”

“I am your king! said Arthur. “Well, I didn’t vote for you,” the woman sniffles.

It is this kind of attitude that the British royal family will have to face when the 96-year-old Queen leaves. Elizabeth’s personal popularity protected the monarchy for decades. But after her, “The Firm” will have to navigate a more egalitarian era. The peasants revolt. The new mass movements of our time – populism, #MeToo, Black Lives Matter – share a common tension: anger against elites who see themselves as entitled just because of who they are. The tolerance of homosexual royal families has diminished.

Modern monarchies, paradoxically, require the kind of popular consent demanded by the peasants of Python. By seeking it, post-Elizabethan Windsors could learn from the tactics of continental Europe’s two largest monarchies, the Spanish and the Dutch.

The Spanish monarchy is in such a situation that the previous king cannot enter his own country without angering the people. Juan Carlos abdicated in 2014 after a variety of scandals from shooting an elephant on a luxury safari to trying to pressure his ex-lover in London to pay him back 65 million euros – a generous Saudi gift he had passed on to her. He is now exiled in Abu Dhabi, but when he traveled to Spain last month, after paying his tax bills late, the government wouldn’t even let him stay at the royal palace. The current king, Felipe, is frantically trying to undo the damage his father has done to the monarchy.

Even in the much more royalist Netherlands, King Willem-Alexander’s ratings hit an all-time high due to his sense of impunity over Covid-19 restrictions: he had to apologize for spending holidays in Greece as the government asked people not to travel. Like other monarchies, the Dutch Oranjes have also suffered from the demise of a popular press that sold royal fairy tales and the rise of acerbic social media.

Even so, the more accessible Dutch royal style suggests a possible future for the Windsors. The Oranjes present themselves as a “cycling monarchy”: a fairly ordinary but super-rich family that just happens to have a crown. One night in 1990, in the bar of an Amsterdam student society, my touring English student football team met a chubby blond Dutch contemporary: Willem-Alexander, then Crown Prince. My teammates were amazed: meeting a royal in the wild just didn’t happen in Britain.

King Willem-Alexander, dressed in informal clothing, sits smiling and holding a drink as he chats with others at a table.  The queen sits next to him

King Willem-Alexander and Queen Máxima have a drink with local entrepreneurs in Valkenburg last month © EPA-EFE

He knows how to play the good bourgeois, working in anonymity for more than 20 years as a part-time pilot of KLM Cityhopper planes, and now hosts Ukrainian refugees in one of his castles. In Spain, King Felipe is aiming for even more sobriety. In April, trying to be transparent, he declared his personal fortune: 2.6 million euros. (The Spanish Bourbons were relatively poor until Juan Carlos began dating the Gulf royals.) Felipe has more to worry about than the Windsors or the Oranjes: Republican dominance in some Spanish polls, especially among young people, suggests that the Spanish monarchy could possibly be abolished in the near future. referendum as was the case in Italy in 1946 and in Greece in 1974.

Felipe’s sobriety will never be Windsor’s way, but a future King Charles could reduce the number of royals who receive state aid. Charles shares his mother’s inability to talk to ordinary people, but his sons’ greater mutual contact could help the Windsors – so to speak – continue to win re-election.

A man wearing a mask carries a portrait of Spain's former king Juan Carlos who is removed from a legislative chamber in Navarre

A portrait of the former King of Spain, Juan Carlos I, is removed from a legislative chamber in Navarre in June 2020 © Europa Press via Getty Images

Even then, they can lose parts of their kingdom. Monarchs are supposed to embody national unity, but that is precisely why national separatist movements dislike them. In Spain, a region’s level of royalism correlates with its sense of being Spanish, so the monarchy is popular in a pro-Spanish region like Extremadura and unpopular in regions with their own nationalism: the Navarre, the Basque Country and especially Catalonia. Given that Felipe is usually mocked in Barcelona, ​​where the Supreme Court of Spain had to force the town hall to display an image of him, it is difficult to say that he is still king of Catalonia.

The kingdom of the Windsors may also shrink, emotionally and possibly legally. Barbados became a republic last November. The Queen’s death would be an obvious time for Republicans in Australia and even traditionally more royalist Canada to demand referendums on the monarchy. Polls suggest they would win. In the UK, the monarchy is less popular in Scotland than in England, while Republicans Sinn Féin are now Northern Ireland’s largest party.

The Windsors will probably keep their throne as long as there is an England. But the Spanish lesson is that every monarch must win the crown again. After Elizabeth, the Windsors will have to win the peasant vote.

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School leaders are the only hope to end gun violence https://uscprssa.com/2022/06/01/school-leaders-are-the-only-hope-to-end-gun-violence/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 05:30:54 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2022/06/01/school-leaders-are-the-only-hope-to-end-gun-violence/ His answer still shocks me, “Yes, Dr. J. That’s right.” He said it with such conviction and talent. At that time, I prayed that I would never have to make such a decision. The following year, as my door was open and my students were working in groups in the hallway, a young girl ran […]]]>

His answer still shocks me, “Yes, Dr. J. That’s right.” He said it with such conviction and talent. At that time, I prayed that I would never have to make such a decision.

The following year, as my door was open and my students were working in groups in the hallway, a young girl ran down the hall yelling, “He has a gun. Immediately, I called all the students to my room and locked my door. I covered the rectangular glass of the door. I gathered students in the corner as they texted their parents and cried in silence. The school has gone into lockdown.

My students and I saw the front of the school surrounded by every county law enforcement officer. I stood there trying to calm the students down while remembering the officer’s words from last year, praying that our school wouldn’t be the next statistic. It was one of the most terrifying times of my life and my profession. It was a moment most Americans will never experience (which is also a reason why there was no change).

The weapon turned out to be a pellet gun, but the emotionality of the moment is still with me. It is now part of my college’s teacher preparation classes. I never believed that one day class preparation would involve preparing teachers for school shootings. Yet, this is the state of American education.

Joseph R. Jones (courtesy photo)

Credit: courtesy photo

Credit: courtesy photo

Joseph R. Jones (courtesy photo)

Credit: courtesy photo

Credit: courtesy photo

The aim of the school is to reinvent society and influence it positively. Schools are responsible for creating a better society, framed by the ideals of humanity. Given our current political climate, schools are once again faced with a challenge within society at large.

According to The Violence Project (a national, nonpartisan organization funded by the National Institute of Justice), “98% of mass shooters identify as male,” and the majority are white. Over 80% were in a noticeable crisis prior to their shooting, some of which include abusive behavior, isolation and increased restlessness. Additionally, hate-motivated mass shootings have rapidly increased since 2015.

The Violence Project looked at data specific to school shootings: 91% of shooters were current or former students, 87% were in crisis, 80% were suicidal, 78% had disclosed plans before the shooting, and 50% shooters were specifically targeting someone.

According to the research, there are important findings for schools. First, educators at all levels must create inclusive educational environments. It is imperative that every student feels valued and affirmed. In addition, all students should feel a sense of belonging to the school culture.

Second, educators must teach empathy. We want to believe that most students have the ability to empathize with others, but in my experiences as a high school teacher and middle school professor, students lack empathy. Acknowledging the pain and experiences of others can be a powerful tool in creating a safe classroom.

As a teacher trainer, I regularly cover topics related to mental health, but I will spend more time preparing future teachers to understand the role it plays. These discussions have primarily been regulated for graduate students in school counseling programs, but teachers who interact with students daily must be prepared to recognize the signs and symptoms.

Another aspect is to create an environment where students feel safe to share their concerns. Students are immersed in social media and many are aware of school events before they happen through social media. Students are also surrounded by student gossip, which most teachers never find out about. They should be encouraged to share information. Schools should move from a culture of silence to a culture of responsible citizenship.

Finally, we need to look at how men are socially normalized. I argue that men’s beliefs about violence are socially constructed differently than their female counterparts. The researchers suggest that men are less empathetic, implying that male students should be targeted when trying to build empathy within the student body. There are reasons why most mass shooters are white males, and schools need to examine those reasons and socially constructed beliefs of masculinity, especially white masculinity.

As I stood in my classroom, my view flickered between 30 students crammed into one corner and the police outside my windows. At that time, I hoped they would save us. I was hoping that I wouldn’t have to stop the bleeding. In this moment of crisis, my mind was completely focused on my students and their pain. With another shooting, my mind is once again focused on the students and my role in tackling the problem.

Schools have to do something because our political leaders are not trying to make reasonable changes. Until they do, the schools must save themselves and our society, as we must always do when irrationality is accepted at the expense of intellectualism.

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