Relations Practitioner – USC PRSSA http://uscprssa.com/ Fri, 04 Jun 2021 09:30:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://uscprssa.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Relations Practitioner – USC PRSSA http://uscprssa.com/ 32 32 Dudek dedicates 26 years to Roswell Leadership https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/04/dudek-dedicates-26-years-to-roswell-leadership/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/04/dudek-dedicates-26-years-to-roswell-leadership/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 04:12:33 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/04/dudek-dedicates-26-years-to-roswell-leadership/ Copyright © 2021 Roswell Daily Record The Leadership Roswell Alumni Association presents awards annually to outstanding members of the community, with recipients nominated by area residents and chosen by a selection committee. The Roswell Daily Record will publish an article on each of the four winners. This is the third article in the 2021 series. […]]]>


Copyright © 2021 Roswell Daily Record

The Leadership Roswell Alumni Association presents awards annually to outstanding members of the community, with recipients nominated by area residents and chosen by a selection committee. The Roswell Daily Record will publish an article on each of the four winners. This is the third article in the 2021 series.

Working to build the Roswell Leadership Program has been a big part of Laurie Jerge Dudek’s life for approximately 26 years, since she herself took the program in 1995 and served as class president.

“She probably convinced a dozen people to take the course, including myself,” said Elaine Mayfield, also an active member of the Leadership Roswell Alumni Association.

Dudek won the 2021 Alumni Award in recognition of his years of effort for the group. Since 1983, the group has offered a nine-month leadership training program that educates local professionals from all economic sectors in Chaves County, Roswell and New Mexico.

While the Leadership Roswell Alumni Association has been giving out its other annual awards for over 20 years, the Alumni Award is relatively new, with only three previous recipients.

Support local journalism
Subscribe at the Roswell Daily Record today.

Mayfield, who also worked with Dudek for about 25 years in the city of Roswell when Dudek ran the Parks and Recreation Department and Mayfield ran the Spring River Zoo, described Dudek as an accomplished professional characterized by her drive and vigor. .

“As a professional she is always well prepared and thorough,” said Mayfield, also describing Dudek as “bubbly, full of life, energetic with energy to burn, absolutely caring, always there”.

The award honors Dudek for the “hundreds and hundreds of hours” she devoted to the organization as a program director from 1996 to approximately 2010 alongside attorney Rick Kraft, volunteer CEO since 1992. Even after leaving the position of program director, she remained involved in coordinating an introductory exercise each year and worked with Kraft on her “signature” presentation on attitude.

“Basically it was continuity from year to year,” Kraft said. “We have a class president who would help us for a year. They would work for a year, then we would have another to replace them. But Laurie was my right hand. She worked side by side with me in managing the program.

He added that she had a “contagious” attitude that spreads happiness in others.

“She’s really a joy to be around,” he said. “It adds value. She adds value to my life and, I believe, to members of the community. She is very dedicated, a very hard worker. His attitude is what really shines.

For all of his involvement with Leadership Roswell, Dudek is known to many in the community for more than that.

She grew up in Roswell in a close-knit family and a fifth generation of New Mexicans. She said her grandmother gave her a lasting nickname of “Little Miss Sunshine” and that her parents, Christine and John, taught her to work hard and give back. She has two sisters and a brother who died in 2019.

“I have to say that my family was my inspiration to become the best version of me,” she said. “And even at my age, I’m still trying to hit that bar. I feel like I am the most blessed person on earth.

She graduated from Roswell High School in 1984, with trainer Flo Valdez a great influence on her.

“She called me ‘RM’, for reliable manager, and taught me that it takes hard work to make your dreams come true,” Dudek said.

Dudek also praised the teachers at Eastern New Mexico University-Roswell, where she obtained her associate degree. She went on to earn a bachelor’s and master’s degree, both in human performance and sports, from the University of the Highlands of New Mexico. While in Highlands, she also ran an exercise studio.

She said she had no doubts she would return to Roswell, and she did so around 1991, first working for the YMCA, then joining the city’s Parks and Recreation group. When she left town after 28 years, she was the superintendent of its recreation and parks program and said she felt most accomplished in helping to establish the Party on the River and Cinco de Mayo event, the Robert Goddard Days and Science Discovery Festival and July 4th Party.

“What a wonderful experience to wake up and know that at the end of the day you would have touched so many lives in such a positive way,” said Dudek. “There is no greater satisfaction than seeing smiles on children’s faces. “

She was also involved in the effort to build the new Roswell Recreation and Aquatic Center and said that after that she felt ready to take on a new challenge.

In December 2019, she assumed a new role as the Southeast Region Health Promotion Manager for the New Mexico Department of Health. In this role, she works with eight counties to educate a population of around 250,000 people about health and wellness issues and to improve access to care, and to build links between the health department of the ‘State and community medical and health organizations.

Her volunteer work has included giving time to the Assumption Catholic Church and working with the Chaves County Community Foundation. She also continues the ties she and her family have with ENMU-Roswell.

“Laurie has served on the board of directors of the ENMU-Roswell Foundation since 2011,” said college development director Donna Oracion. “She has been a dedicated and enthusiastic member of the Board of Directors and has participated in many foundation events, such as our annual golf tournaments, over the years. She is a true advocate for our campus and her two daughters are graduates of ENMU-Roswell.

His previous accolades include a Distinguished Young Professional Award from the National Parks and Recreation Association, as well as the KUDOS Group Awards for his public relations and marketing efforts. Dudek also received the Governor’s Award for Outstanding Young Women of New Mexico.

Dudek has words of praise for her immediate family, including her husband Kameron Dudek, whom she married in 2017 and calls a “God send”. Daughter DeAnna Hendrickson is a registered nurse in Carlsbad working to become a nurse practitioner, while Amanda Jerge is an occupational therapist assistant studying to become a certified occupational therapist. She describes them as “beautiful inside and out”.

She said she viewed Rick Kraft and former Roswell City Manager Bob Thomson as two of her most important mentors. She calls the Roswell Leadership program a “turning point” in her life.

“This program is life changing and it gives you the tools to make positive change,” she said. “I am an advocate for them and a strong supporter of their mission to create future leaders. “

Lisa Dunlap can be reached at 575-622-7710, ext. 351, or at reporter02@rdrnews.com.



Source link

]]>
https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/04/dudek-dedicates-26-years-to-roswell-leadership/feed/ 0
Aberdeen FC | First woman appointed to Aberdeen Football Club’s Board of Directors https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/03/aberdeen-fc-first-woman-appointed-to-aberdeen-football-clubs-board-of-directors/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/03/aberdeen-fc-first-woman-appointed-to-aberdeen-football-clubs-board-of-directors/#respond Thu, 03 Jun 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/03/aberdeen-fc-first-woman-appointed-to-aberdeen-football-clubs-board-of-directors/ Zoe Ogilvie will join the Aberdeen Football Club board this month, becoming the first female manager in the club’s 118-year history. The Aberdeen businesswoman has been appointed a non-executive director focusing on marketing and communications strategy as the club ramps up its fan engagement and community programs, which are critical to growing its base. seasonal […]]]>


Zoe Ogilvie will join the Aberdeen Football Club board this month, becoming the first female manager in the club’s 118-year history.

The Aberdeen businesswoman has been appointed a non-executive director focusing on marketing and communications strategy as the club ramps up its fan engagement and community programs, which are critical to growing its base. seasonal subscriptions.

AFC President Dave Cormack said, “Zoe is incredibly well connected and brings significant credibility to the public and private sectors. She has been instrumental in defining and implementing our communications strategy over the past 18 months and has been central to successful club and trust campaigns.

“She is committed to helping drive and successfully implement our fan and corporate engagement programs, being a welcoming host on match days and an active Club ambassador to the community at large.”

A highly regarded public relations practitioner in Scotland, Zoe has nearly 30 years of communications and marketing experience in the UK and abroad, including eight years with the Aberdeen & Grampian Chamber of Commerce as Head of public affairs before forming the BIG Partnership.

As a director of BIG, now one of the UK’s largest public relations and marketing agencies outside of London, Zoe heads the Aberdeen office which represents clients in the energy, real estate, professional services and food and beverage.

She is also a member of the Board of Governors of Robert Gordon University and of the Board of Directors of Aberdeen Inspired.

Zoe is married and has a daughter, Francesca, who plays for AFC Women and was a Scottish Under-19 internationalist.

Commenting on her appointment, Zoe said: “It is a privilege to make history as the first female director of the AFC and an honor to serve a club which is a vital part of the socio-economic fabric of the region and which is cherished by so many people.

“Having worked with the Club on various projects for many years, I have gained invaluable experience of its operations and the dedicated people who work there. I’m excited to be joining the board, but don’t underestimate the challenges we face and the responsibility that comes with this role.



Source link

]]>
https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/03/aberdeen-fc-first-woman-appointed-to-aberdeen-football-clubs-board-of-directors/feed/ 0
alumnus embraces her passion for leadership, diversity, equity and inclusion | Information Center https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/02/alumnus-embraces-her-passion-for-leadership-diversity-equity-and-inclusion-information-center/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/02/alumnus-embraces-her-passion-for-leadership-diversity-equity-and-inclusion-information-center/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 17:40:26 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/02/alumnus-embraces-her-passion-for-leadership-diversity-equity-and-inclusion-information-center/ Channelle McNutt’s experiences (’13, ’17 MBA) as a student leader at SDSU helped her discover “the essence of who I am”. “My experience as a student leader has exposed me to new opportunities, especially in leadership and management consulting. For Channelle McNutt, a curriculum vitae laden with extracurricular activities at San Diego State University brought […]]]>


Channelle McNutt’s experiences (’13, ’17 MBA) as a student leader at SDSU helped her discover “the essence of who I am”.

“My experience as a student leader has exposed me to new opportunities, especially in leadership and management consulting.

For Channelle McNutt, a curriculum vitae laden with extracurricular activities at San Diego State University brought a form of empowerment, a sense of community, and a career path very different from what she had anticipated.

During her undergraduate years, McNutt (’13, ’17 MBA) served as Executive Vice President and Commissioner for Diversity and Inclusion at Associated Students, President of the Afrikan Student Union, Founder of a Chapter of the National Association of Women MBAs and Reunion Queen in 2012. While earning her Masters, she worked on campus for three years in the Department of Academic Relations and Development (URAD).

McNutt, originally from San Diego, initially considered attending Howard University in Washington DC, but was faced with a choice when she was also accepted to the SDSU.

“I ended up choosing the State of San Diego because of the closeness to family, the diversity of the student body and the Veterans Affairs program, ”said McNutt, whose father served in the US Navy. “Ultimately my parents were the driving force behind my choice of SDSU and I think they were more excited than me when we received my letter of acceptance.”

Initially, McNutt planned to become a lawyer, but mapped out an alternative career choice during her freshman year.

“My experience as a student leader has exposed me to new opportunities, especially in leadership and management consulting,” she said. “I knew that my degrees in political science and communication could benefit me whatever my career aspirations, but I knew that I wanted additional skills and that obtaining my MBA could help me launch a career in deals. ”

Empowerment sparks activism

It was also during her junior year that McNutt became more involved in the student organizations that empowered her. “As a first generation college student, I really didn’t know what to expect from my college experience and the adjustment was overwhelming at times,” she said. “Once I got involved in the African Students Union and Associate students, I really felt like I was part of a community. And that’s where my journey in Activism, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DCI) began – as a student leader. I have kept these experiences on campus.

After earning her bachelor’s degree, McNutt began full-time employment in SDSU’s URAD department while enrolling in the MBA program at Fowler College of Business, a period that provided her with lessons that she could use in the future. years to come.

“Sometimes I was the only woman of color in my classes and learned the importance of building relationships with people from all walks of life,” McNutt said. “I also learned that sometimes you have to create or build what doesn’t exist.”

In McNutt’s case, she was able to work with faculty and staff at Fowler College of Business and College of Education to optimize her MBA experience. She chose two education courses in student equity and strategic planning at community colleges as electives to provide her with the education she needed to assist her in her work as an SDSU development officer and later. as a DCI consultant.

As Development Manager for SDSU, McNutt focused on generating philanthropic giving for Fowler College of Business before being promoted to Deputy Director, where she met alumni and managed volunteer committees. in the Dallas-Fort Worth / Austin areas of Texas. . Then, after graduating with her MBA in 2017, McNutt had the opportunity to follow her passion for organizational development, DEI and leadership development as a senior consultant at Jones & Associates Consulting in San Diego.

“DCI is at the heart of who I am,” McNutt said. “From my passion to help and develop others in the service of my community, through being a woman of color (black and Filipino), my mission has always been to” create space and opportunities ” for others, especially people who feel like they don’t have a voice, don’t feel seen or valued.

Make the difference

In his current role, McNutt provides training, coaching and consulting services to leaders and organizations globally in the areas of leadership development, organizational change and diversity, equity and leadership. ‘inclusion.

“The best part of my job is the fact that I can make a difference every day,” she said. “Being a management consultant and DCI practitioner is meaningful work that truly transforms people and organizations. Whether it’s one-on-one with an executive or facilitating leadership training to thousands of people, I truly believe the work I do helps leaders, communities, and organizations.

“I loved my time as a student leader,” she said. “My experiences as Executive Vice President and Diversity and Inclusion Committee for Associate Students, and President of the Afrikan Student Union have truly changed my life. Every important person in my life who was not a member of my family (although they are now my family) was someone I met when I was at SDSU.



Source link

]]>
https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/02/alumnus-embraces-her-passion-for-leadership-diversity-equity-and-inclusion-information-center/feed/ 0
Mitesco, Inc. to present at LD Micro Invitational XI https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/01/mitesco-inc-to-present-at-ld-micro-invitational-xi/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/01/mitesco-inc-to-present-at-ld-micro-invitational-xi/#respond Tue, 01 Jun 2021 20:04:39 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/01/mitesco-inc-to-present-at-ld-micro-invitational-xi/ Receive instant alerts for news on your actions. Claim your 1-week free trial for StreetInsider Premium here. CEO Larry Diamond to present on Thursday, June 10, 2021 MINNEAPOLIS, MN, June 01, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – via NewMediaWire – Mitesco, Inc. (OTCQB: MITI) (“Mitesco” or the “Company”), a leading operator of primary care and wellness clinics […]]]>



Receive instant alerts for news on your actions. Claim your 1-week free trial for StreetInsider Premium here.


CEO Larry Diamond to present on Thursday, June 10, 2021

MINNEAPOLIS, MN, June 01, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – via NewMediaWire – Mitesco, Inc. (OTCQB: MITI) (“Mitesco” or the “Company”), a leading operator of primary care and wellness clinics that combine technology and personalized personal care plans, has announced today that management will present at the LD Micro Invitational XI Investor Conference to be held virtually from June 8-10, 2021.

Larry Diamond, CEO, to host a virtual investor presentation at the event as follows:

2021 LD Micro Invitational XI Date: Thursday, June 10, 2021 Time: 5:00 p.m. EDT – Track 1 webcast: https://ldmicrojune2021.mysequire.com

A live audio webcast and archive of the event presentation will be available using the webcast link above. For more information on the LD Micro Invitational XI, or to register for the event, please visit https://ldmicrojune2021.mysequire.com.

Our operations and subsidiaries: The Good Clinic, LLC and Acelerar Healthcare Holdings, LTD.

The Good Clinic, LLC (www.thegoodclinic.com) is a wholly owned subsidiary of Mitesco NA LLC. The Good Clinic plans to create a network of clinics using the latest telehealth technologies with the nurse practitioner as the primary healthcare provider. It will start in Minneapolis and plans to expand nationwide. Today, 23 states facilitate the practice of nurse practitioners in all of their skills and education. The Good Clinic ™ leadership team includes many of the key executives who evolved Minute Clinic (formerly Quickmedix), which was acquired by CVS for $ 170 million in 2006.

SAFE PORT DECLARATION

This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. All statements other than statements of historical fact contained in this press release are forward-looking statements. In some cases, forward-looking statements may be identified by words such as “anticipate”, “believe”, “may”, “continue”, “could”, “estimate,” “expect”, “intend” , “Could”, “plan”, “potential”, “predict”, “project”, “should” or “will” or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology and include statements regarding plans to expand the concept of good clinic care at other locations These forward-looking statements are based on expectations and assumptions as of the date of the press release and are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, many of which are difficult to determine. predict which could cause actual results to differ materially from current expectations and assumptions from those stated or implied by forward-looking statements. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from current expectations include, among others, our ability to expand The Good Clinic concept of care to other locations as planned, our ability to live up to our mission to improving healthcare for patients around the world, and other factors discussed in Mitesco, Inc.’s annual report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020, and subsequent SEC filings , including periodic reports on Forms 10-Q and 8-K. The information contained in this press release is provided only as of the date of this press release, and the Company does not undertake to update any forward-looking statements contained in this press release as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, unless required by law. .

Investor Relations Contacts:

Brian M. Prenoveau, CFA or Brooks Hamilton MZ Group – MZ North America 561-489-5315 MITI@mzgroup.us

Source: Mitesco, Inc.



Source link

]]>
https://uscprssa.com/2021/06/01/mitesco-inc-to-present-at-ld-micro-invitational-xi/feed/ 0
Africa’s Chief Optimist, by Wole Olaoye https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/30/africas-chief-optimist-by-wole-olaoye/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/30/africas-chief-optimist-by-wole-olaoye/#respond Sun, 30 May 2021 18:45:00 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/30/africas-chief-optimist-by-wole-olaoye/ Mr. Akinwumi Adesina, President of the African Development Bank, AfDB (PHOTO CREDIT: @AfricanBizMag) Adesina is so optimistic about Africa that he has been labeled the continent’s “Chief Optimist”. What does he see that others don’t? Or rather how is African history rewritten through the instrumentation of AfDB development interventions and how can the rest of […]]]>


Mr. Akinwumi Adesina, President of the African Development Bank, AfDB (PHOTO CREDIT: @AfricanBizMag)

Adesina is so optimistic about Africa that he has been labeled the continent’s “Chief Optimist”. What does he see that others don’t? Or rather how is African history rewritten through the instrumentation of AfDB development interventions and how can the rest of the continent adhere to its admittedly noble dream?

“Don’t judge a runner by the challenges he or she faces, or the strain on his or her legs while running, or even the grimaces on their faces; judge them at the finish line. Africa will finish its development race well, against all odds! This is the prediction of the President of the African Development Bank (AfDB), Dr Akinwumi Adesina.

An encouraging prediction indeed.

Last week the world marked Africa Day. The African Public Relations Association (APRA) held its annual conference virtually, in accordance with the “new standard”. APRA prides itself on creating a professional environment conducive to an accurate perception, goodwill and understanding of the necessary and effective performance of public relations practice in Africa. Its annual intellectual fiesta typically attracts stakeholders from around the world with the aim of heralding a more positively perceived and prosperous Africa.

Delegates and guests from 26 countries attended the 2021 edition.

No one else could have set the tone for the conference, but the president of the continent’s premier development finance institution, the AfDB – the same bank recently named “World’s Best Multilateral Financial Institution for 2021” by the US magazine frontline, Global finance. The theme of the conference was “One Africa! Walk towards economic integration and the role of public relations in the age of Covid-19. “

Adesina is so optimistic about Africa that he has been called the continent’s “chief optimist”. What does he see that others don’t? Or rather how is African history rewritten through the instrumentation of AfDB development interventions and how can the rest of the continent adhere to its admittedly noble dream?

The first plea launched by the President of the AfDB is that Africans must do themselves a favor: stop standing out on the continent! Some of the most negative stories shared about Africa are written by Africans themselves. While not advocating denial of verifiable reality, Adesina advocates self-love. There are many positive things about Africa, he notes, than the usual staple of wars, famine, disease and poverty.

Among the PR practitioners who made up the bulk of the audience were champions in branding, messaging and reputation management. They couldn’t agree more with Adesina that if you don’t say ‘I am’ the rest of the world doesn’t have to recognize ‘you are’.

“We need you as public relations and media partners to help organize and disseminate these successes. Success stories of Africa’s progress on its path to actualizing the Africa We Want as outlined in the African Union’s Agenda 2063! Your role is essential to ensure that people are inspired by the gains made on Africa’s path to prosperity, ”said Adesina.

Due to the crucial role PR professionals can play in transforming the continent, AfDB now plans to initiate a new strategic partnership with the African Public Relations Association to help weave a beautiful tapestry of stories. resilience of a continent progressing against all. chances!

He gave examples of the impact of the work of the African Development Bank on the lives of ordinary people. Ms. Jamila from Ghana benefited from access to improved agricultural technologies through the AfDB’s Savannah Agricultural Productivity Project. His testimony: “The Bank’s program allowed me to increase my cultivated area by 9,000%. Now I am going to buy a mechanized combine for my crops ”. From Ethiopia, one of the farmers said, “I built my house with the produce from my farm and now I can support my four children in school,” while Ms. Grace from Kenya noted that the Bank support enabled him to access electricity in his village: “We were once in the dark, now we can see”.

Adesina argues that there is no continent without its own problems and that anyone with an eye on the future cannot ignore Africa. Due to the crucial role PR professionals can play in transforming the continent, AfDB now plans to initiate a new strategic partnership with the African Public Relations Association to help weave a beautiful tapestry of stories. resilience of a continent progressing against all. chances!

COVID-19 has ravaged the world. In Africa, 30 million people have been pushed into extreme poverty. An additional $ 39 million is predicted to sink further into extreme poverty this year. Foreign direct investment in Africa increased from $ 45 billion in 2019 to $ 27 billion in 2020. Similarly, portfolio investment increased from $ 27 billion in 2019 to $ 19 billion in 2020.

TEXEM

In response, the AfDB announced a $ 10 billion Crisis Response Mechanism to help African countries cope with the urgent health and economic effects of the pandemic and provided another $ 28 million grant to the African Center for Africa. disease control to strengthen its ability to fight the scourge.

Before COVID, Africa had the second fastest rate of economic growth in the world. Foreign direct investment has grown faster in Africa than anywhere else. Africa was also reforming its business environment. With the advent of COVID, GDP growth declined 2.1%, the worst in over 25 years. It should be noted, however, that 13 African countries posted positive growth rates amid the global recession. A cocktail of new challenges has since emerged, but Adesina believes Africa will bounce back. “The AfDB estimates that the continent’s GDP growth will rebound towards a positive trajectory of 3.4% this year,” he said.

To show what can be achieved if words are combined with action, the AfDB has, over the past five years, had a positive impact on the lives of 335 million people: 20 million people have had access to ‘electricity; 74 million people gained access to agricultural technologies for food security; 10 million people gained access to finance; 69 million people gained access to improved transport services through investments in infrastructure; and 43 million people gained access to improved water and sanitation.

For PR practitioners across the continent, the APRA 2021 conference reinforced the appeal to all professionals to protect and enhance the African brand. AfDB’s achievements in Africa are a good indicator of the continent’s limitless possibilities. And who can tell this story better than those gathered at the annual Ideas Party?

And the landscape is changing, thanks to forward-looking projects that should propel trade and improve life across the continent: the historic Séné-Gambia Bridge connecting Senegal and The Gambia, the expansion of Togo’s container port. , which has tripled its capacity; the Kazungula Bridge, connecting Zambia, Botswana, Zimbabwe and Namibia; the 1,000-kilometer highway from Addis Ababa to Mombasa, via Nairobi; the Noor Ouarzazarte project in Morocco (the largest concentrated solar power plant in the world); and the Lake Turkana Wind Power Plant in Kenya, the largest of its kind in sub-Saharan Africa.

The Bank is currently investing in the Desert to Power initiative in the Sahel region to build the world’s largest solar zone, which will provide electricity to 250 million people in eleven countries. Accelerating industrialization could create up to 14 million stable jobs over the next decade. The AfDB is also supporting 234,000 young people with digital skills to make them competitive in the digital world and create nine million jobs. At the next African Investment Forum, the AfDB and its partners have already prepared to present a pipeline of 230 projects worth $ 208 billion.

In view of all of the above, there is reason to be optimistic if – and only if – the serious security challenges affecting various parts of the continent are urgently addressed.

For PR practitioners across the continent, the APRA 2021 conference reinforced the appeal to all professionals to protect and enhance the African brand. AfDB’s achievements in Africa are a good indicator of the continent’s limitless possibilities. And who can tell this story better than those gathered at the annual Ideas Party? Several other insightful articles featured during the three-day virtual event reinforced the theme “One Africa!” March towards economic integration and the role of public relations ”. And the worthy finale: the Saber Awards Africa 2021, in which the best practitioners in the profession on the continent were presented with awards in different categories by the inimitable global public relations icon, Paul Holmes.

If the conference were an oracle, its verdict would be that Africa is the new frontier of prosperity, as long as the cobwebs of insecurity that entangle the continent are erased.

APRA President Yomi Badejo-Okusanya from Nigeria summed up the sentiments of his colleagues across the continent: “Africa must tell its own story. And there is no better person to tell it than the authentic storyteller of the continent: the African PR practitioner!

Wole Olaoye can be reached via wole.olaoye@gmail.com.

Support PREMIUM TIMES integrity and credibility journalism

Good journalism is expensive. Yet only good journalism can guarantee the possibility of a good society, responsible democracy and transparent government.

For free and ongoing access to the best investigative journalism in the country, we ask that you consider giving modest support to this noble endeavor.

By contributing to PREMIUM TIMES, you are helping to maintain relevant journalism and ensure that it remains free and accessible to everyone.

Make a donation


TEXT AD: Advertise Here . Call Willie +2347088095401 …





PT Mag AD campaign



Source link

]]>
https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/30/africas-chief-optimist-by-wole-olaoye/feed/ 0
Concerns Over Alleged New Looting of Over $ 1.5 Billion In Abacha Loot | The Guardian Nigeria News https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/30/concerns-over-alleged-new-looting-of-over-1-5-billion-in-abacha-loot-the-guardian-nigeria-news/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/30/concerns-over-alleged-new-looting-of-over-1-5-billion-in-abacha-loot-the-guardian-nigeria-news/#respond Sun, 30 May 2021 04:35:00 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/30/concerns-over-alleged-new-looting-of-over-1-5-billion-in-abacha-loot-the-guardian-nigeria-news/ Abacha • Amount recovered uncertain – FG • Government helps mother to investigate• Lack of transparency, non-accountability Loot from peatlands – Stakeholders Economists, legal practitioners as well as other professionals and civil society organizations have expressed concerns about the mismanagement of looted funds returned, in particular the money stolen by the former head of state, […]]]>


Abacha

• Amount recovered uncertain – FG • Government helps mother to investigate
• Lack of transparency, non-accountability Loot from peatlands – Stakeholders

Economists, legal practitioners as well as other professionals and civil society organizations have expressed concerns about the mismanagement of looted funds returned, in particular the money stolen by the former head of state, the general Sani Abacha.

Disturbed by the growing wave of corruption across the country, despite the much-talked-about anti-corruption campaign of the current administration, experts are further stung by reports that the returned loot has been looted again, from especially since financial transactions have remained opaque, lacking in transparency and accountability.

This growing fear, perhaps, recently forced the Sultan of Sokoto, Muhammadu Sa’ad Abubakar III, to ask the federal government to explain to Nigerians how much of the country’s looted funds it has so far recovered.

As the federal and Delta state governments continue to fight against the returned £ 4.2million stolen by former Governor James Onanefe Ibori, experts have stressed there is every reason to return the money stolen from the state in the spirit of true federalism.

It was as the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) said last Friday that the value of jewelry seized from a former Minister of Petroleum Resources, Diezani Alison-Madueke, stood at around N14.460b, while the Panel special presidential investigation had accused the top government. those responsible for embezzling $ 69 billion (about N 28.3 billion) allegedly hidden in Texas bank accounts as a result of illegal oil deals by suspicious officials of the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation.

Last month, the federal government said it was unclear how much money was actually stolen from under Abacha and how much was recovered. Up to $ 5 billion was reportedly stolen by the deceased chef alone.

The funds, mostly from oil and gas, flowing out of the country as Illicit Financial Flows (IFFs) hover around N 103t over the past 15 years, The Guardian previously reported.

From 2007 to 2020, around $ 1.5 billion was returned to Nigeria from different parts of the world. In addition, between 2007 and 2018, Switzerland returned over $ 1 billion to the Nigerian government, and in June 2014, Liechtenstein sent $ 277 million to Nigeria.

In May 2020, $ 308 million held in accounts based on the Channel Island of Jersey was sent to Nigeria. The monies returned brought the total Abacha loot returned to $ 1.5 billion.

As staggering revelations continue to emerge on a daily basis about the extent to which public officials plunder the treasury, most stakeholders are emptied of the lack of accountability and the blatant lack of transparency regarding loot recovered abroad despite demanding conditions. appropriate use / application of these funds. .

It should be remembered that although most states get rescue funds from the loot returned, they have always fought to pay the wages.

It is instructive to point out that the condition for the return of Switzerland’s last batch of money was that the money be used for the Second Niger Bridge, the Lagos-Ibadan Highway and the Abuja-Kano Highway. But the current state of the projects, most stakeholders agree, does not justify the money being spent wisely. This development, say most experts, calls into question the sincerity of the war on corruption waged by the administration led by President Muhammadu Buhari.

Federal Ministry of Works and Housing Director, Media and Public Relations, Oyeboade Akinola, did not respond to calls and messages from The Guardian about the amount spent so far on the returned loot projects. Ditto for the spokesperson for the Minister of Public Works and Housing, Hakeem Bello, who also did not respond to his calls and messages on this subject.

At the Ministry of Finance, Nwodo Charles, the spokesperson for the ministry said he needed time to obtain specific information on the matter.

On the status of projects where part of the fund was to be spent, The Guardian reported that the federal government had so far released a total of N116.72b for the highly politicized second bridge in Niger, a project valued at N414b, and should be delivered next year.

While Public Works and Housing Minister Babatunde Raji Fashola said earlier that the Lagos-Ibadan highway will be completed by December 2021, some stakeholders note that reaching the target may be elusive given of the current state of the road, just as the conclusion of the Abuja-Kano highway has remained elusive.

While the African Network for Environment and Economic Justice (ANEEJ) revealed that 703,506 poor and vulnerable Nigerians, out of a registered figure of 834, 948 targeted in the Nigerian social register received a total of 23.742 billion naira on Abacha’s booty recovered of $ 322.5 million. Switzerland on December 31, 2019, as part of the conditional cash transfer of the social investment program (SIP), the SIP had been attacked, in particular for lack of transparency and accountability.

Lead Partner – Nextier Advisory, Patrick Okigbo told The Guardian that the new looting of returned looted funds could continue to flourish due to fundamental issues, including bad principles.

With the government having a wealth of information more than the masses about corruption, and failing to voluntarily equip the public with it, Okigbo said the new looting of returned looted funds would continue.

“For years academics have thought of corruption to be a principal-agent problem, which has informed various anti-corruption initiatives. But if a “principle director” is in charge, he will ensure that agents (politicians, bureaucrats, private sector) stay on the right track. Pay higher wages and agents will be less corrupt. Whistle the blowers and the corruption will stop. Reduce the discretion of politicians and bureaucrats over decisions and limit their powers. Increase the cost of the sentence and most will avoid the crime. Governments have tried all of the above with marginal impact on corruption. In fact, in some cases corruption has increased, ”he noted.

According to him, the excitement of the new and young anti-corruption czar will wane very soon when it becomes clear that he is rowing against the tide, not for lack of intention, but because he is using the wrong tools to drive out the stupid.

Okigbo, who argued that a strong system was needed, especially one that would ensure the independence of the judiciary, added that Nigeria could get worse with corruption.

“My point is that the way we are doing now is not going to solve the problem. It might even make the problem worse because the more we talk about the billions that people steal, the scientific evidence shows that everyone then starts to believe that everyone is corrupt, and when they believe that everyone is corrupt, no one will. wants to be a fool. So they also get involved, ”he said.

For the former president of the Chartered Institute of Bankers of Nigeria (CIBN) and professor of economics at Babcock University, Segun Ajibola, the federal government must explain to Nigerians how the looted funds were spent.

Ajibola noted that while some trust the administration to have spent the returned loot wisely, providing further explanation on the matter would determine whether the funds were best used.

And for the lawyer, Madaki Ameh, the general perception of Nigerians, which seems well founded, remains that the returned funds are regularly looted by government officials in the current administration.

“This is due to the opaque nature of collections to date and a clear lack of accountability over the use of recovered funds. Without such transparency and a clear consequence attached to impunity, the practice will continue, ”Ameh said.

The director of the Center for Democracy and Development (CDD), Idayat Hassan, said the opacity and lack of transparency had succeeded in obscuring the use of the loot recovered.

In her view, when it comes to actual recovery and asset recovery tracking, much needs to be done for citizens to be able to determine where funds are channeled or spent.

“Apart from the three big projects, what happened to the other funds? What exactly were they used for and is the government presenting it to citizens? How does the government communicate it to citizens? I think these are the fundamental issues, ”she said.

She added that corruption has become even more technical, diverse and relentless under the current administration.
The pro-tem president of the Chartered Institute of Forensic Pathologists and Investigators of Nigeria (CIFIPN), Dr Enape Victoria Ayishetu told the Guardian that she had honored the presidency’s invitation regarding the repatriated loot and recommended the best way to spend the funds.

Ayishetu noted that the federal government was advised to spend the money through the budgeting process to ensure transparency and accountability, but the advice was ignored.

“We can only advise or recommend options that will ensure wise use, we cannot force the government to decide. We made our presentation and our recommendation, that’s the best we can do, ”she said.

Ayishetu noted that it was not surprising that corruption continues to flourish in the country despite the anti-corruption war, stressing that the country would not win the fight without the right mechanism.

She said: “The fight against corruption cannot be successful without the necessary tools. There is corruption all over the world, the only thing that differs is the mechanism people have used to fight or prevent it. Without forensic investigation, we cannot win the war. ”

She said a bill to entrench forensic investigations is facing obstacles in the country, adding that the growing level of corruption in the country is responsible for the level of hardship and insecurity. She insisted that sentiment has bogged down the fight against corruption in the country, forcing the war back instead of signifying progress.

The Center for Transparency Advocacy (CTA) alleged that the returned loot was misappropriated and not properly used. Its executive director, Faith Nwadishi, said the money was being used for things not intended, adding that it was difficult to track how the government is spending the money.

This development, she said, has compromised accountability, transparency and deprived citizens of the right to information about how money is spent.

“The corruption has worsened. Policies are only on paper and are never implemented. This administration’s second term is even worse. It’s business as usual. We have to make people account for what is going on. The NDCC probe went under the carpet. The oversight role of the National Assembly is also compromised, ”Nwadishi said.



Source link

]]>
https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/30/concerns-over-alleged-new-looting-of-over-1-5-billion-in-abacha-loot-the-guardian-nigeria-news/feed/ 0
Letters to the Editor, May 30, 2021 | Notice https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/29/letters-to-the-editor-may-30-2021-notice/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/29/letters-to-the-editor-may-30-2021-notice/#respond Sat, 29 May 2021 08:50:06 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/29/letters-to-the-editor-may-30-2021-notice/ Media During my 40 year career, I have worked as a writer and editor in newspapers and magazines and also as a public relations practitioner. I know the difference. While AP, ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN and Associated Press et al. want to be public relations for Joe Biden, the Democratic National Committee, and the radical […]]]>


Media

During my 40 year career, I have worked as a writer and editor in newspapers and magazines and also as a public relations practitioner. I know the difference.

While AP, ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN and Associated Press et al. want to be public relations for Joe Biden, the Democratic National Committee, and the radical left, they should at least have the professional courtesy to stop pretending to be news agencies and start reimagining themselves with cute PR names.

Media organizations are meant to be watchdogs, not companion dogs.

Growth

My former boss advised his senior managers: “We finish the spinach on our plate before we eat our dessert.” He meant that we would do the best job possible by performing essential functions with maximum efficiency; if the budget remained there would be opportunities for the “right things to do”.

It is unfortunate that Boise City Council member Holli Woodings is “still in mourning” over the proposed $ 104 million Moshe Safdie Library suspension and the need to divert $ 25 million in public funds for more needs. pressing.

A nice downtown branch library can still be owned. But next time around, the vision must show greater fiscal prudence, a more realistic vision, less environmental impact and better oversight of citizens through a public vote.

With soaring post-pandemic steel, concrete and timber costs, the nearly 70% of Boise voters approving our 2019 citizens’ initiative did this city a huge favor, dissuading it from going head-to-head. lowered in such an expensive endeavor.

Please do not erect statues in their honor. Spend the money to solve the problems of growing up in this new city you invented for us.

David Klinger, Boise, on behalf of Boise Working Together

Parties

It is time for the press to stop calling Idaho’s “radical new right” and the nation “conservative.” There is nothing in this group that looks like anything from the Conservative Party that my long-deceased mother and stepfather could relate to. There is no sense of “conservation” left in this ramification brought about by the election of # 45 and its administration … in particular by honoring our Constitution and Article II section 1 of the sacred document.

Bernie Sanders has hit the nail on the head pretty well with this published statement … “Either the Republican Party can be the party of the big lie, of racism, of division – or it can be a conservative party that believes in democracy and rule. of law. It cannot be both.

I hope that in the years to come, the “real conservatives” will mobilize and denounce the emergence of the radical right as well as the agenda of division and destruction put forward by the previous administration. We need a voice of reason and cooperation to keep our democracy alive and moving forward.

Leadership

On May 16, that newspaper featured an article about the Boise Police Department and their need for more officers and the recruiting challenges they face. Apparently, few people want to be police officers. In the wake of George Floyd, several cities decided to dissolve their local police services. Police services are bad actors or are racist.

This discourages people from standing up to “protect and serve” in our police services. Why would they do it? Would you do it if you were insulted?

But perhaps the worst was when Lisa Sanchez, Pro-Tem President of Boise City Council, posted on Facebook on June 5, 2020, that she had a woman of color who wouldn’t take a ride with our service. Boise police. out of fear for his personal safety. She posted this. Do your own fact check.

We should remember his words and his attitude in the upcoming city council election… and reject it.

Our city needs thoughtful leadership.

Cheating

The May 27 edition reported that one of our lawmakers questioned whether Boise State University’s recent investigation into the campus “indoctrination” allegations could be independent, complete and impartial. Will he be equally concerned about the independence, completeness and impartiality of the Lieutenant Governor’s Campus Indoctrination Task Force? Someone once said, what is good for the goose is good for the eyes. Will our legislator let off steam and avoid this question? Hopefully not. If he does, I will shout “poultry game”.

Turmoil

Are you a city or county official struggling to fund essential services in the wake of Idaho’s new property tax bill? Are you in the construction business and wondering how you will survive a possible “pause” or moratorium on construction fueled by the new law? Are you a resident living in mortal fear of the tax bill you will receive in November? All this angst and turmoil could have been avoided. It is the result of a flawed bill sponsored by Mike Moyle that was led astray by the legislature in the penultimate days of the session under suspended rules. There was a better way to reduce property taxes. Representative Bruce Skaug sponsored, along with 48 cosponsors, a bill that would have provided a landlord exemption of about $ 152,000 without any of the nonsense affecting local governments. Representative Steven Harris, chairman of the Income and Taxation Committee, never authorized consideration of Skaug’s bill. If you believe in holding politicians accountable, Mike Moyle and Steven Harris are two good names to remember in 2022.

Investigation

Now we can all be quiet. Boise State hired a law firm to conduct a cursory investigation of himself and surprisingly found no indoctrination of students with Marxist “critical race theory” and other indoctrinations from the radical left. that divide! Who would have guessed? Nothing like asking 30 students about a student body of 25,400, including 22,000 undergraduates, who are due to take the UF 200 political, social and environmental indoctrination course. have they been selected? Who were they? Were they progressive leftists with CRT? The results of this so-called survey are questionable to say the least. I suggest you go online and review the syllabus for the UF 200 course. You can clearly see what this compulsory course teaches: the progressive / Marxist indoctrination of the worldview on topics such as race, gender. , climate, class, economy, morality, patriotism, etc. How about an independent investigation by a credible source?

Contributions

Commentary from Ronald Harriman. It is time to limit political contributions to all in national elections to citizens with valid social security numbers. More power for our citizens.

The Idaho Press does not guarantee factual accuracy and does not endorse the opinions expressed in letters to the editor. If you would like to respond to something you read here, please send a letter to idahopress.com/opinion



Source link

]]>
https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/29/letters-to-the-editor-may-30-2021-notice/feed/ 0
Meet Our Staff – Washington County Visitors Association https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/28/meet-our-staff-washington-county-visitors-association/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/28/meet-our-staff-washington-county-visitors-association/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 18:56:01 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/28/meet-our-staff-washington-county-visitors-association/ Operations and administration Dave Parulo: President and CEODave joined WCVA on June 1, 2021. Dave served as President of Meet Chicago Northwest for over a decade. During his tenure, the organization was recognized as “Best Chicagoland CVB in Illinois ” in 2017 and 2019. During his time at Meet Chicago Northwest, he was recognized as […]]]>


Operations and administration

Dave Parulo: President and CEO
Dave joined WCVA on June 1, 2021. Dave served as President of Meet Chicago Northwest for over a decade. During his tenure, the organization was recognized as “Best Chicagoland CVB in Illinois ” in 2017 and 2019. During his time at Meet Chicago Northwest, he was recognized as Business Leader of the Year speak Rolling Meadows Chamber of Commerce and twice nominated for Business Leader of the Year speak Arlington Heights Room. A hotel professional for thirty years, he previously worked as a hotel manager for Starwood and Hilton designer hotels in Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Minneapolis and Washington, DC. Originally from western Pennsylvania, he graduated from Pennsylvania State University and Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

Jason McGill: Chief Financial Officer and Operations
Jason is a Chartered Accountant with a BA in Business Administration from Walla Walla College in Washington State and an MBA from California State University, San Bernardino. Prior to joining WCVA, McGill worked at Gary McGee and Company as a senior partner.

Marketing and communications

Sylke Neal-Finnegan, APR: Vice President of Marketing and Communications
Sylke joined WCVA in June 2007 and oversees WCVA’s Marketing Department, serves as Editor-in-Chief and is responsible for all marketing initiatives including media relations, advertising and online content. A certified public relations practitioner with a Bachelor of Arts in Communication from the University of Nevada in Las Vegas, Sylke has over 25 years of travel public relations and marketing experience. Prior to joining WCVA, she worked for a number of tourism related companies, including high profile casino resorts and the Las Vegas Convention & Visitors Authority.

Christopher Glawe: graphic designer
Chris joined WCVA in January 2011 as a graphic designer. He designs all of WCVA’s print and online advertisements, as well as marketing materials. Chris is originally from Oregon, but has spent the past 20 years living and working as a graphic designer in New York City. While in the Big Apple, he obtained his Associate of Professional Studies in Graphic Design from the Pratt Institute, then received his BFA in Graphic Design from the School of Visual Arts. When Chris isn’t designing, he is found reading comics, visiting art galleries, and creating art projects.

Kailee Van Dyke: Administrative and Marketing Coordinator
A graduate of the University of Oregon, Kailee holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism with a major in electronic media and a second degree in marketing. After graduation, she worked for a public relations firm, A.wordsmith in Portland, supporting ongoing strategic communications campaigns. She also worked at Nike in the events center and the innovation department. His most recent role was at the Portland Expo Center supporting the team and contract development. As a Washington County resident, she enjoys shopping at the Beaverton Farmers Market, running the Fanno Creek Trail, and tasting local craft ciders. Kailee joined WCVA in September 2018.



Source link

]]>
https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/28/meet-our-staff-washington-county-visitors-association/feed/ 0
BREAKING: Biden appeals to union for NLRB fifth seat https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/26/breaking-biden-appeals-to-union-for-nlrb-fifth-seat/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/26/breaking-biden-appeals-to-union-for-nlrb-fifth-seat/#respond Wed, 26 May 2021 15:16:00 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/26/breaking-biden-appeals-to-union-for-nlrb-fifth-seat/ Law360 (May 26, 2021, 11:16 a.m. EDT) – President Joe Biden appointed labor lawyer Gwynne Wilcox to the National Labor Relations Board on Wednesday, calling on a practitioner on the labor side to fill the long-vacant fifth seat on the panel. Wilcox is a senior partner at New York-based law firm Levy Ratner PC and […]]]>


Law360 (May 26, 2021, 11:16 a.m. EDT) – President Joe Biden appointed labor lawyer Gwynne Wilcox to the National Labor Relations Board on Wednesday, calling on a practitioner on the labor side to fill the long-vacant fifth seat on the panel.

Wilcox is a senior partner at New York-based law firm Levy Ratner PC and associate general counsel for 1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East, a major unit of the health and services industry union. Wilcox was previously a field lawyer in the Manhattan office of the NLRB.

If confirmed, Wilcox would take an open board seat since former NLRB chairman Mark Gaston Pearce expired in August …

Stay one step ahead

In the legal profession, information is the key to success. You need to know what’s going on with customers, competitors, practice areas, and industries. Law360 provides the intelligence you need to stay an expert and beat the competition.

  • Access to case data in articles (issues, filings, courts, nature of prosecutions, etc.)
  • Access to attached documents such as briefs, petitions, complaints, decisions, motions, etc.
  • Create personalized alerts for specific case articles and topics and more!

TRY LAW360 FREE FOR SEVEN DAYS



Source link

]]>
https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/26/breaking-biden-appeals-to-union-for-nlrb-fifth-seat/feed/ 0
I got it from my mama https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/11/i-got-it-from-my-mama/ https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/11/i-got-it-from-my-mama/#respond Tue, 11 May 2021 07:34:22 +0000 https://uscprssa.com/?p=497 Usually, when Mother’s Day comes around, lists upon lists appear. They consist mainly of things to buy, treats to order and pampering services to book for the mothers in our life. This year, Lifestyle takes a different tack and peers at the gifts a mother bestows on her children—both tangible and intangible—and how they helped […]]]>


Usually, when Mother’s Day comes around, lists upon lists appear. They consist mainly of things to buy, treats to order and pampering services to book for the mothers in our life. This year, Lifestyle takes a different tack and peers at the gifts a mother bestows on her children—both tangible and intangible—and how they helped define who we are today.

My mother, Esperanza J. Chee Kee, taught English to high school students for over 30 years. When she finally retired, she had given a total of 40 years of her life to the Ateneo. I learned from her the delight that comes from reading, not as part of schoolwork, but mainly for one’s enjoyment.

She would tell me stories of Beowulf, O. Henry’s “Gift of the Magi” and Guy de Maupassant’s “The Necklace.” One particularly creepy story was of a woman who wore and never removed a ribbon around her neck. I was probably eight at the time, and that precise moment when the woman’s husband unties the ribbon that had been keeping his wife’s head attached to her neck the whole time is crystallized in my mind like a hapless fly caught in amber.

We asked people what they are thankful for that their mothers taught or gave them.

—With reports from Cheche V. Moral, Pam Pastor and Ruth Navarra

Cultivate a sense of fashion

Retailer Ben Chan with his mother See Ying

At a young age, I was exposed to my mom’s stylish sense of fashion and interest in interiors. She influenced me a lot, as this is the career path I chose later on. I fondly remember how she knew every family member’s birthday, including those of her great-grandchildren. She made sure to greet everyone on their special day, and would prepare traditional Chinese miswa for good luck. I miss my mom a lot!

—Ben Chan, retail honcho, on mom See Ying

Earrings and eyebrows on fleek

My mom taught me two things: First, I am not to ever leave my house without earrings because I would look like a boy. Second, my eyebrows always have to be fixed! I remember when I was younger, she would rate any makeup artist by how well they were able to fix my eyebrows.

My mom loves all things Filipino. Here is one of my favorite earrings from her, opals in vintage setting by jewelry designer Tita Celia Molano.

Marga Nograles and mom Mary Ann Montemayor

—Marga Nograles, Kaayo apparel and accessories brand founder, on mom Mary Ann Montemayor

Love the skin you’re in

The most memorable fashion/beauty advice my mom ever gave me is to embrace your body and never fear showing off your assets—meaning, bodycon is beautiful! Whether it’s a tight dress to enhance your curves, short shorts or miniskirts to show off your legs or a plunging neckline, wear it with confidence! To this day, I really credit my mom for the confidence I have to wear whatever I wanted, whatever shape I was in—biggest or healthiest. Nothing feels better than being confident in your own skin and only my mom could have passed that on to me.

—Tina Tinio, fashion executive, on mom Mary Ann Cuenca Tinio

Less is more

My mom would always tell me that less is more. Just use an ample amount of moisturizer on your face, a light dab of eye cream and petroleum jelly on eyelids, and you’re good to go.
When buying shoes, dapat daw laging may one inch allowance para pwede gamitin ng mas matagal because I’ll never know if I’ll grow big or gain weight! Also, she told me not to use shampoo every day but just put conditioner so hair is healthier-looking.

—Macoy “Tita Julie” Averilla on his mother Leonora Lacanlale

Use sunscreen

My mom has always been big on skin care. When we were young, she was also very particular about keeping acne at bay and making us use sunscreen, saying that good skin always makes a great first impression.

My mom taught us about self-care at a very early age, because if we can’t take care of ourselves, we can’t take care of others. Happy Mother’s Day, Mom!

—businessman Linfred Yap, distributor of Korean skin-care brands Papa Recipe and True Water, on mom Li Eng Yap

Kai Lim and her mom Christina Nakanishi: “We haven’t had photos together since the pandemic.”

‘Keep your things well’

Best fashion advice from my mom? “Love and keep your things well and they will last forever.”

I used to think my mom was too meticulous in taking care of her things. She would spend a lot of time storing and cleaning each item. Now I understand why and I’m becoming like her—archiving, storing and restoring.

This Cartier clutch was one of my dad’s first gifts to my mom when they were dating. More than 40 years later, it is in pristine condition. I’m confident it can be passed on to my daughter. The story behind the clutch is priceless.

—Kai Nakanishi Lim, coowner of Comme Çi and Cura V, on mom Christina Nakanishi

Harold Geronimo and mom Helen in prepandemic Paris

Grooming lessons

When I was growing up, I remember how Mama was always diligent in making sure that I put on my clothes, socks and shoes neatly. She was very particular about wrinkles on fabric, and how clean the whites were.

She would scrutinize my hair—how it looked, how shiny or how messy it was. In fact, she would comb my hair almost every hour during my grade school years.

I got used to these habits and they eventually became part of my lifestyle: I always want my clothes crisp and neat, my shoes always shiny and clean, and my hair properly done when I go out.

In terms of life’s principles, Mama always reminded me to get up when I’m down, and to never quit the fight of life. These guided me to become a stronger person, and to take every adversity as an opportunity to become a better version of me. Mothers really know best for their children.

—Harold Geronimo, senior assistant vice president and head of public relations and media affairs of Megaworld Corp., on mom Helen Geronimo

Tourism Secretary Bernadette Romulo Puyat and mom Lovely Romulo, prepandemic: “That was the last time we were this close.”

Best skin-care tip

She taught me that Pond’s Cold Cream is best to remove makeup and to clean my face. In fact, just today (May 3), she sent me Pond’s Cold Cream from Japan because it’s always out of stock in Manila. It’s so lola, but I still use it!

—Tourism Secretary Bernadette Romulo Puyat on mom Lovely Romulo

No to tight clothes

My mama always reminds me that life is too short to wear uncomfortable clothes. I take this practical advice to heart. Too-tight tops, shorts and skirts have no space in my closet.

—Maureen Disini Teichert, fashion designer, on mom Princess Monjera Disini

Mama’s scent

As I was growing up, my mama would give me and my sister the best pieces of beauty and fashion advice. One particular advice which I live by and practice until today: to always be clean, neat and tidy.

When I was a little girl, I would watch her put on her makeup and get dressed for work. I would always be in awe of how she put everything together, from the time she chose her clothes, accessories, shoes, bags until she put on her fragrance. She always looked so neat and well put together!

As she left for work, I would sneak up to her dresser and try on her beauty products! Until now, we share the same love for beauty brands such as Clarins, Chanel, La Prairie, NARS, Laura Mercier and L’Occitane, to name a few. We also love going to spas and salons together and get excited over what nail color and new hairstyle to try!

But one of my most favorites were her perfumes! I loved it when the scent lingered on after she left the room, and when she came back home, the scent was still there. This was how my love for fragrance started, and which ultimately led to my personal choices of fragrances.

My love for fresh, clean scents stemmed from my mama’s advice to be clean, neat and tidy. She would often buy me after-bath baby colognes, mostly Spanish brands, and this developed my own love for fresh, clean scents.

What I love most about scents is that it captures a childhood memory, a story, a place and a special person in my life, like my mama.

—Mica Chanco Agdamag, advertising and PR manager of Rustan’s The Beauty Source, on mom Sandy Agdamag

Dina Tantoco and mom Marilene Jacinto

Heirloom jewelry

My favorite objects inherited are pieces of jewelry given to me by my mom. One particular accessory was one designed by my mom herself.

—Dina Arroyo Tantoco, marketing manager of Rustan’s, on mom Marilene Jacinto

Twinning

My mom likes my hair really, really short. This pandemic, I had more than my usual hair fall so I had to cut it short, actually shorter than I am comfortable with. She loved it! When it grew a bit longer, she kept on reminding me to go back to the salon and have it trimmed. I procrastinated and then another lockdown happened. She never misses an opportunity now to tell me, “I told you so.” I don’t admit it to her, but I do like my hair shorter now.

When we travel, we like buying matching tops and have our twinning photos. Since we are mostly at home now, my current favorite items from her are our souvenir shirts and sandos. These are my pandemic uniform and these remind me of our fun travels.

—Kelly Austria, PR consultant, on mom Betty May Austria

Flawless

My mama’s skin was always more flawless than mine. She would always tell me to wash my face before going to bed and never sleep with my makeup on. Basic but really important.

I had this heart stone gold-plated stud earrings and ring, but I lost the ring when I was in high school. I loved them simply because they were from my mom. She’s always a giver to everyone.

Thank you, Mama! I love you.

—Jorja Maria Almendrala-Molina, doctor, on mom Miles Almendrala

‘Keep it classy’

She always reminded me to keep it classy. My mom also taught me that good fashion need not be expensive or outrageous.

I will never forget how we frequented Hong Kong with the family and shopped in small indie label boutiques for years. She can pick a trendy item and mix it with a more traditional piece and come out chic. To this day, she is as sensible and stylish.

There are many little things that I cherished through the years from her. She likes timeless and elegant designs and she fueled my childhood with unique hand-me-downs and most of all, Vogue subscriptions when they were scarce. She saw how I could pore through her magazines and gave them to me. I think that started my life-long love affair with fashion. It was a love for good design that I developed because of her . . . and not just one, tangible object.

—Carmina Sanchez-Jacob, mother, marketing communications professional and brand development consultant, on mom Aida Cuneta Sanchez

Ailene Chua Co and mom Clarita

‘Sleep at least eight hours’

My mom told me to sleep at least eight hours, power nap and wash my face before going to sleep. But the best advice she gave me is to be kind to others and to love one another.

—Ailene Chua Co, chief executive officer of A-List and Partners Consulting Group Inc., on mom Clarita Chua

‘Never be too flashy’

My mom taught me not to focus too much on trends or brands, and to never be too flashy. Because of her influence, I gravitate toward more classic pieces that can stand the test of time and before I buy anything, I always look at the cut, stitching and quality of the fabric.

My mom also taught me to never waste money on costume jewelry. If I should spend money, I should always just buy real jewelry, because a pair of diamond earrings can elevate a simple outfit much more than anything fancy ever can.

My favorite piece is my diamond earrings, because they came from her.

—Celine Gabriel Lim, cocreator of Honest Junk and Kiele Naturals, and director, Mullenlowe Marc, on mom Myra Gabriel

Love for jewelry

My love for jewelry is heavily influenced by my mom. I grew up seeing her buying these stuff that glitter and I had no idea then how precious those things were.

What I treasure most from my mom is the set of heirloom jewelry she left behind because I consider these “storied” pieces. They have so much family history, and a lot of care and love are associated with these pieces.

—Mickey See, makeup artist, on mom Cresencia Dayrit See

Statement piece

When it comes to style, my mom would always say, be known for wearing a statement piece together with classic and plain pieces. My mom in her little black dress has always been her most iconic style moment.

—Danielle Wassmer, associate account director, Red Havas, on mom Maria Luisa Meneses-Wassmer

Jade Aveo and mom Maricor Defeo

‘Sunscreen, sunscreen, sunscreen’

Sunscreen, sunscreen, sunscreen, and don’t go to sleep without washing your face and moisturizing!

—Jade Aveo, commercial pilot, on mom Maricor Defeo

Jookie C. Radoc and mom Lilian

Real beauty

Mommy Lilian is the most beautiful woman in the world. She taught me that real beauty comes from within. We don’t need expensive beauty products and clothes to look good because when you are truly beautiful from the inside, this will make you glow on the outside. She always tells me that a good-natured smile is still the best makeup you can wear.

—Jookie C. Radoc, media relations manager, on mom Lilian

Dressing to the nines

My mom is always incredibly put together and never steps out in public without dressing to the nines! I think my philosophy of being overdressed rather than underdressed definitely comes from her!

I think my most valuable object is a pair of heart-shaped diamond earrings. My dad gave them to her and when I turned 18, she passed them on to me and I take them everywhere I go. My mom says diamonds bring good energy and are lucky, and she always wears them daily and not just for special occasions. I love the sentimentality of jewelry being passed on and I want to pass it to my daughter someday!

—Mich Dulce, fashion designer, milliner, corsetiere and band vocalist, on mom Yrna Ileto

Diamonds and pearls

My mother says to always wear jewelry but stick to diamonds and pearls. Your shoes should always match your bag.

My favorite pieces from her are matching diamond studs and watch because they dress up any outfit and make you look polished in an instant.

—Bea Bautista, public relations director, on mom Pauline Bautista

Low maintenance

My mom is very low maintenance, and from her I learned that less is more.

She was a banker for 35 years and was always practical about beauty and fashion. Years before it was trendy, my mom chopped off her thick, wavy hair and kept her hair very short since the ’80s.

She always looked chic and styled her look with statement eyeglasses or earrings. She had a style that was distinctly her own, and was always unapologetically herself. She never swayed with the trends and kept things classic.

She doesn’t rely on a ton of products for her skin or hair, but looks great for 70! I guess her minimalist approach to beauty and fashion works.

My mom has a pair of South Sea pearl drop earrings that I absolutely love because they’re elegant, classic, timeless. I always borrow them for weddings. They work perfectly for formal occasions, but can also easily dress up a white shirt.

—Mae T. Dichupa, marketing professional, on mom Elaine Torrejon Dichupa

Colorful clothes

Even when I was still young and had a lanky figure, my mom always encouraged me to wear colorful clothes. She said that this would help me look like I have a little weight, and it just became a habit! I am very drawn to colorful clothes and unique cuts. She also pointed out to me that fashion doesn’t have to be expensive, and it’s the way you carry it. Until now, whenever there’s a milestone event, I always ask for her advice on what to wear.

No heirlooms, only continuous fashion advice and style. I really got it from my momma.

—Charisse Vilchez, business director, Red Havas, on mom Loulette Ibazeta Vilchez

Co-ords

My mom would wear what we now call co-ords—a blouse and skirt with the coordinating prints she would have her tailor make back then. She would never leave the house without makeup (at least powder and lipstick!) and her perfume. Now my fave and go-to look is monochromatic and print on print and I never leave the house without spraying on my favorite perfume, wow brows and lip tint.

I got my penchant for jewelry and accessories from my mom. From time to time, I gift her with accessories and jewelry. On her wedding day with my papa in the early ’70s, she wore this beautiful embroidered column dress with white gold and garnet jewelry—the bracelet from that set is one of my most prized possessions.

—Myrrh Lao To, celebrity fashion stylist, on mom Irene Lao To

Animal prints

My mom never said it, but she always wore them. So it was her way of telling me, “Don’t be afraid to wear animal prints or prints on print.” A favorite piece of jewelry is a long strand of solid gold beads that was given to her by my father, which she passed on to me.

—Lady Bess Howe, PR consultant, Better Mondays PR Consultancy, on her mother Stephanie Baluyut

‘Maligo araw-araw’

My mom’s fashion advice: “Hoy, ’pag lalabas ka ng bahay para maglaro, mag-brip ka! Her beauty advice: Pwede ba, Mykil, maligo ka araw-araw.

—Myke Salomon, musical director, theater actor, singer, on mom Edorne Salomon

Living stress-free

Growing up, I watched my mom live a very happy and active lifestyle and eat a balanced diet full of veggies while doing Zumba and, at the same time, doing her church duties as the president of Apostleship of Prayer in our parish, and visiting a lot of places and doing pilgrimages. She is so fit and to this day, people think she’s 10 years younger than her age, 69.

My Mama Emma is very minimalist when it comes to make-up, but she has taught us the importance of eating healthy, living stress-free and being beautiful inside and out. She constantly reminds us to sleep early, because cells start to regenerate at 10 p.m., and to wake up early to exercise.

She taught me to apply oatmeal with milk and honey to moisturize my very sensitive skin and to condition my hair with aloe vera plant.

How she values belongingness, helping those in need, true and lasting relationships and spending quality time with family and friends isn’t just fun, but can help you age gracefully and live longer. She is indeed our light and our strength.

My ultimate fave piece from my mom is the Speedy Louis Vuitton handbag that is now vintage, and not just iconic but timeless. I definitely got my love of bags from her.

—Millet Liberato-Simeon, founder and managing director of M360° PR+Activations Agency, on mom Emma Liberato

Vintage gold necklace

My favorite thing that my mom handed over to me a few years ago was a vintage gold necklace. It’s very sentimental and special because it has a pendant locket containing a black-and-white photo of my papa when he was still a young man. She asked me to treasure it and reminded me to also put a photo of my future husband on the other side of the locket, in time.

My mom is now 80, but still moves around the house and learned navigating Facebook and watching dog videos on YouTube.

—Therese Janice Iglesias, public relations specialist, on mom Diana Iglesias

Always with me

My mom’s fashion advice is that simplicity is the greatest sophistication. My favorite piece of jewelry from her is a diamond ring. It gives me comfort, for I feel she is always with me.

—Anna Tiglao, makeup artist, on mom Adela Tiglao

Cowboy vest

My mom’s cowboy vest that she was wearing when she met my dad! Even as a younger woman, my mom was always a fashionista (she was known to wear yellow fishnet stockings in college, and electric orange pants to work), and for her blind date, she chose to wore this brown, hand-stitched cowboy vest with fringes up to the floor. It’s a curious choice to make a first impression in, but I guess it worked on the young doctor in the blue button-down shirt and yellow Hush Puppies who turned out to be my father.

Thankfully, she’s sentimental and has carefully kept it all these years, so I have actually been able to wear it. (Sadly, it has not brought me a dashing doctor to marry!)

I think the vest beautifully represents her unique, fun, and on-point style, but is also a great reminder of my parents’ lasting and loving relationship. Most of all, I think it shows how my mother treasures memories and people, and does everything to cherish and nurture these. In a time of tired, I’ve-seen-it-all cynicism and stories that last 24 hours, my mother always inspires me to keep and cherish joy, hope, and gratitude in my life.

—Monique Buensalido, PR and digital executive, on mom Joy Buensalido

‘Never mix yellow, rose and white gold’

She told me never to mix yellow, rose gold and white gold accessories together. She said to be consistent with the color of the jewelry I am wearing. The price of the accessory doesn’t matter.

What’s important is that they look good on you and you feel confident wearing them. You are the one who makes your accessories look good, and not the other way around.

As an adult who doesn’t live with my parents anymore, whenever I get to visit them, I always find myself bringing home something from her stack because I like her taste.

—Kathy P. Solis, managing director for SustainablePH, broadcaster for “StanUp With Oro,” host of “Breakfast With The King” and “New Normal: New World” and PR practitioner, on mom Imee Solis

Less is more

Fashion/beauty advice: less is more.

My mom has a penchant for jewelry and I was lucky to inherit a pair of gold hoop earrings and a ruby ring from her that she gave me on my 18th birthday. It’s one of those timeless pieces that I currently have that matches almost anything, and makes me feel so much closer to my mom whenever I wear it, specially at this time of pandemic.

—Sheena Teresa Asis, training and development coordinator, on mom Tessie Sy

Always wear a good outfit

Best fashion advice that I got from my mom is to always wear a good outfit every time you go outside the house, even if you’ll just go to the supermarket or buy some suka and toyo from the sari-sari store. According to her, we need to make a good impression on our kapitbahay.

My favorites are a pair of leggings and her old clothes, because when I was growing up gay, my mom was always supportive of what I am. She’d tell me, “Proud ako sa yo anak kahit ano mang mangyari.” Funny, because I have two sisters, and I was always the one wearing her old clothes. I remember when she was still an OFW in Saudi Arabia, she would ask if I wanted a new pair of leggings, because I always used her old pants.

—Alvin James Araneta Cariño, senior PR specialist, on mom Jocelyn Araneta Cariño

Gift of protection

When I was little, my mother gave me a necklace with a St. Christopher pendant, for protection. I lost the chain after Mama passed away, but I always kept the pendant in my pocket or wallet so it would be with me anywhere I went. For my birthday three years ago, my then boyfriend (now husband) gifted me with a chain so I could wear the pendant again.

I wear it every time I go out or I keep it in my pocket with me. I wear it for its sentimental value.

– Cyril Bonabente-Paradero, communications manager, on mom Rose Bonabente

Mom with the pearl earrings

When I moved to Singapore, I asked my mom if I could have her pearl earrings with diamonds. The jewelry just looks elegant and beautiful. I would wear it when I have important presentations in the office. But now that I’m far from family and haven’t been home for more than a year, I wear it whenever I miss her.

– Cynthia Matias, advertising operations director, on mom Corazon Matias

Pam Solilapsi and mom Sonia standing out in a sea of people

Stand out

Her advice: have fun with outfits and don’t be afraid to mix and add color, prints or a loud element in your wardrobe. Even if you have a closet with mostly neutral colors, these bursts of color are good to add to what you’re wearing. Also, to stand out in a sea of people when traveling!

-Pam Solilapsi-Guerrero, Boozy.PH COO and co-founder, on mom Sonia Solilapsi

Symbols of love

Mama’s pearly bag was a gift from my father and the rosary was my grandma’s, handed down to Mama. They are two pieces that remind of my mom every time, her elegant spirit and prayerful heart. The bag has been to a few formal occasions and the rosary goes with me on all my trips. I imagine Mama’s happy up there, knowing I’m taking care of these symbols of love from long ago that she cherished. I can feel all that love still.

-Sheila Gonzales Copywriter, on mom Soledad Yabut-Gonzales

Same work ethic

When my mama says that I’m her daughter, she’s not talking about my fashion sense, language, or anything superficial. Instead, she pertains to our similar mindsets when it comes to organization and work ethic. Besides me wanting to break into the same industry she once worked in, we usually bond over the fact that we like to fuss over to-do lists, clean work spaces, and successfully meeting deadlines on a day-to-day basis. In that sense, I can say that yeah, I really am like my mama!

– Giulia Martinez, student, on mom Liza Fernandez-Martinez



Source link

]]>
https://uscprssa.com/2021/05/11/i-got-it-from-my-mama/feed/ 0